Wouff-Hong

Wouff-Hong

Post by Thomas Cart » Wed, 10 Jun 1992 07:37:39

   While perusing a copy of the 1938 Radio Amateurs Hanbook (ARRL), I found
   these paragraphs at the end of chapter one, under the heading "Traditions":

       As the League has come down through the years, certain traditions
      have become part of amateur radio.
       "The Old Man" with his humorous stories on "rotten radio" was one
      of amateur radio's principle figures. Beginning in 1915 his pictures
      of radio and radio amateurs as revealed by stories in QST were
      characteristic and inimitable. There was much speculation in amateur
      circles concerning the identity of T.O.M., but in twenty years of
      writing he never once gave a clue to his real name or call. It was not
      until the untimely death of Hiram Percy Maxim, first president of the
      League, in 1936 that it was disclosed that he himself had been T.O.M.
       The "Wouff-Hong" is amateurs radio's most sacred symbol and stands
      for the enforcement of law and order in amateur operation. It came into
      being originally in a story by T.O.M. For some time it was not known
      just what the Wouff-Hong looked like, but in 1919 The Old Man
      himself supplied the answer by sending in to League Headquarters the
      one and only original Wouff-Hong, shown here. It is now framed and
      hangs on the wall of the Secretary's office at A.R.R.L. Headquarters.

   Does anyone out there know what the "Wouff-Hong" is and what the story
   The Old Man told about it was. I have asked around and can't find anyone
   with that kind of memory. None of the amateurs I talk to seem to know.
   Below is a crude reproduction of the photo in the Hanbook. The Wouff-Hong
   is made of two pieces of roughly hewn wood held together in the center
   by a metal band or collar. Size is difficult to jugde from the photo,
   but the pieces look to be roughly the size of small axe handles (or
   maybe hatchet handles.) The top of the left fork seems to be covered
   with a metal sleeve or cap.

                                              Thanks...

                                       __
                                      /  |
                                     /   |
                                     |   |
                                     |   |
                                     |   |
                                     |   |
                                     |   |
                                     |   |
                                     |   |
                             ___     |   |
                            /   \    |   |
                            |   |    |   |
                            |   |    |   |
                            |   |    |   |
                            |   |    |   |
                            |   |    |   |
                            |   |   _|   |
                            |   |  /     |
                            |   \_/      /
                            |----|------/
                            |----|-----/
                            |----|----/   <----  iron band holding two
                            |----|---/           two pieces together
                            |----|--/
                            |----|-/
                            |    |/
                            |    |
                            |    |
                            |    |
                            |    |
                            |    |
                            |    |
                            |    |
                            |    |
                            |____|

--
________________________________________________________________________________
Thomas B. Carter  Explosion Administrator |  Center for Seismic Studies

________________________________________________________________________________

 
 
 

Wouff-Hong

Post by Fred Lloyd [Phoenix S » Wed, 10 Jun 1992 08:17:36



>   Does anyone out there know what the "Wouff-Hong" is and what the story
>   The Old Man told about it was. I have asked around and can't find anyone
>   with that kind of memory. None of the amateurs I talk to seem to know.

The complete story was in a January issue of QST, perhaps the 75th
anniversary issue, a couple of years ago.  To summarize:

The Old Man (the pen name of Hiram P. Maxim), had been listening
to some rotten code and all he could make out of the jumble were
the letters wouff hong.  He then wrote in his column about hearing
the jumble and wondered aloud what it could have meant.  Some time
later, a reader mailed the "object" to QST explaining that
it was in fact a Wouff Hong and that its intended use was that
it was to be used upon those poor radio operatiors in an unimaginable
manner.  It is said that one should consider the shape of the tool
and what _could_ be done with it.

Eventually, the Wouff Hong was framed and put on the wall at ARRL HQ
became legend in itself.

-fred

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| Sun Microsystems Computer Corporation                   ...sun!flloyd |
| Phoenix, AZ    (If it's a fact, I believe it!)         (602) 275-4242 |

 
 
 

Wouff-Hong

Post by John Mille » Wed, 10 Jun 1992 10:50:36

[details omitted . . . ]

Quote:>    Does anyone out there know what the "Wouff-Hong" is and what the story
>    The Old Man told about it was. I have asked around and can't find anyone
>    with that kind of memory. None of the amateurs I talk to seem to know.
>    Below is a crude reproduction of the photo in the Hanbook. The Wouff-Hong
>    is made of two pieces of roughly hewn wood held together in the center
>    by a metal band or collar. Size is difficult to jugde from the photo,
>    but the pieces look to be roughly the size of small axe handles (or
>    maybe hatchet handles.) The top of the left fork seems to be covered
>    with a metal sleeve or cap.

I wish that memory served just a little better . . . but it's something
along the lines of "the application of the Wouff-Hong is too horrible
to describe."  

If you play your cards right, and are in the right place at the right
time, you just *may* be able to be initiated into the Order of the
Wouff-Hong someday.  Or not.  

73, de

 John Miller, N4VU            Fayetteville              Voice: (404) 676-4189

 -----------------  A tedious tag overwhelms the sig_nature  ----------------

 
 
 

Wouff-Hong

Post by Alan Brubak » Wed, 10 Jun 1992 22:22:08

Well, I am a member of the ROWH (Royal Order of the Wouff Hong).
As with most fraternal organizations, amateur radio has its own
"secret" society, the ROWH. Any radio amateur can become a
member after a dreadful initiation ceremony which by tradition
occurs just past midnight at an ARRL division or national
convention near you. Usually one of the local clubs which helps
to organize an ARRL convention is tasked with the tasteless duty
of performing the midnight ritual of inducting a new crop of
amateurs into the ROWH. Those of us who have survived these rites
are sworn to secrecy as to the content and procedures used to
induct us into this most sacred Order. And this is as it should
be. I suggest that at the next opportunity, when you attend an
ARRL convention, sign up for the midnight ROWH initiation ceremony.
It is an experience which you will not soon forget. Good luck.
--
Alan Brubaker, K6XO      |~~|_  "Pumps have handles, Hams have names;
<IYF disclaimer>         | *  |mine's Lee, what's yours?" - Lee Wical,

 
 
 

Wouff-Hong

Post by clevela » Wed, 10 Jun 1992 23:45:46

Clearly what is shown is a wooden prototype of a 1.2GHz J-Pole.

73 (not 73's)

Grover
WT6P

 
 
 

Wouff-Hong

Post by Ed Hare KA1 » Wed, 10 Jun 1992 22:04:15



>>   Does anyone out there know what the "Wouff-Hong" is and what the story
>>   The Old Man told about it was. I have asked around and can't find anyone
>>   with that kind of memory. None of the amateurs I talk to seem to know.
>The complete story was in a January issue of QST, perhaps the 75th
>anniversary issue, a couple of years ago.  To summarize:
>The Old Man (the pen name of Hiram P. Maxim), had been listening
>to some rotten code and all he could make out of the jumble were
>the letters wouff hong.  He then wrote in his column about hearing
>the jumble and wondered aloud what it could have meant.  Some time
>later, a reader mailed the "object" to QST explaining that
>it was in fact a Wouff Hong and that its intended use was that
>it was to be used upon those poor radio operatiors in an unimaginable
>manner.  It is said that one should consider the shape of the tool
>and what _could_ be done with it.
>Eventually, the Wouff Hong was framed and put on the wall at ARRL HQ
>became legend in itself.

The Wouff Hong can be seen here at ARRL HQ. You do not have to be a
member to get a tour of ARRL HQ (although we may encourage you do
sign up before you leave. :-)  ). Among other things, you can see
the dreaded Wouff Hong, now framed and kept in a glass case along with
some other similar objects of dread.

I must admit, however, that the exact method of its use has become
lost to us. Most of our vistors offer an idea or two ... cracking
the knuckles between the two pieces of wood, and a few other suggestions
(some more colorful than others).

73, Ed.

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Wouff-Hong

Post by glea.. » Wed, 10 Jun 1992 17:00:03


>    Below is a crude reproduction of the photo in the Hanbook. The Wouff-Hong
>    is made of two pieces of roughly hewn wood held together in the center
>    by a metal band or collar. Size is difficult to jugde from the photo,
>    but the pieces look to be roughly the size of small axe handles (or
>    maybe hatchet handles.) The top of the left fork seems to be covered
>    with a metal sleeve or cap.

  A good description, but you left out that the tip of the
dread Wouff-Hong is said to be stained with the *** of lids...

Lee K. Gleason N5ZMR

 
 
 

Wouff-Hong

Post by Bob Mye » Fri, 12 Jun 1992 02:36:24

The VERY short version is that one of the "Old Man" columns ran a story
about the "old man" trying to understand what another station was saying;
due to a poor***at the transmitting end, the OM was copying nothing
but garbage, among which were the words "wouff hong."  At the conclusion
of the column, the OM was musing about just what kind of gear a
"wouff hong" might be, and what it would be used for.  Somehow, this evolved
into the useless tool shown in the picture.  It seems a number of ops
actually made up these things, and proudly displayed them in their stations.

Bob Myers  KC0EW   Hewlett-Packard Co.      |Opinions expressed here are not
                   User Interface Tech. Div.|those of my employer or any other

 
 
 

Wouff-Hong

Post by maurice.r.bak » Fri, 19 Jun 1992 02:12:33

After following this thread about the "Wouff-Hong" for a while, it finally
became apparent.  This sort of thing is why amateur radio is soooooo
relevant to the youth of today.  NOT.

C'mon now.  A bunch of people going ga-ga over a couple dirty old pieces
of wood*** on the wall in Connecticut ?  Secret initiation rituals ?

No wonder this hobby is known for its geekiness & nerdiness.  When are we
going to stop thinking that there's anything special about it ?  Maybe
thirty years ago, when people still sent telegrams and long-distance calls
almost always were made by operators at cord switchboards and portable
telephones were something only James Bond had in the movies.

Today ...... your major source of new hams (i.e., youth) would say "Get a
life!"  

I would close by saying that we must do a better job of promoting
amateur radio, but after further thought merely ask "Why should we bother?"

WA3ZXO

 
 
 

Wouff-Hong

Post by Martin Lafor » Fri, 19 Jun 1992 03:15:24

I own a Kenwood Tm-241A and I did not get the schematic with it.

Is there someone on Internet who can send me a copy of it.

Thanks a lot

Martin Laforce
Repentigny, Quebec

VE2 MLU

 
 
 

Wouff-Hong

Post by Mike Freem » Sun, 21 Jun 1992 07:16:10

In Info-hams Digest V92 #627, WA3ZXO opines:

 >After following this thread about the "Wouff-Hong" for a while, it finally
 >became apparent.  This sort of thing is why amateur radio is soooooo
 >relevant to the youth of today.  NOT.
 >
 >C'mon now.  A bunch of people going ga-ga over a couple dirty old pieces
 >of wood*** on the wall in Connecticut ?  Secret initiation rituals ?

I agree.  In fairness, however, could not one say the same for the
Exalted Order of Elks, the Moose, the Shriners, the Nights of Columbus,
the Oddfellows, etc. etc. etc.  How about *all* organized religion?  In
other words, while I agree that the Wouff-hong business is pretty hokey,
I think that there are a lot of people who would criticize who are
probably sitting in glass houses without knowing it.
 >
 >No wonder this hobby is known for its geekiness & nerdiness.  When are we
 >going to stop thinking that there's anything special about it ?  Maybe
 >thirty years ago, when people still sent telegrams and long-distance calls
 >almost always were made by operators at cord switchboards and portable
 >telephones were something only James Bond had in the movies.
 >
 >Today ...... your major source of new hams (i.e., youth) would say "Get a
 >life!"  

Perhaps.  It is, however, arguable that ham radio is superior to ***, gangs,
crime and ***age sex (though, I suppose, this is also debatable :-)).
 >
 >I would close by saying that we must do a better job of promoting
 >amateur radio, but after further thought merely ask "Why should we bother?"

Yeah.  If we don't believe in the hobby ourselves, we certainly aren't
going to convince anyone else of its virtues.

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Wouff-Hong

Post by Buddy Brann » Tue, 23 Jun 1992 14:34:51

OK ...
About this secret ritual thing: I've always wondered exactly what it is, I
guess that's why it's a secret. Well ... I think it's rather an interesting
thing myself. I really don't think something like it would turn young people
off; it's merely another thing to do. It is not ham radio. Ham radio goes far
beyond secret rituals, and, indeed, this is a VERY small part, very insig-
nificant. I think that ham radio has so much to offer to anyone that some
people will find something to fire 'em up. Secret rituals or no. I didn't know
about this till I got my ticket, and so what? I've been a ham since I was 14--
close to 5 years now. It's been lots of fun. I've met lots of interesting
peoople. I've learned a good deal, and I've learned to appreciate things ...
radio, code ... history too, or at least history of radio, how far we've gotten
and all that. It's gotten me out of a jam or three as well. I think that all
of this is what ham radio is, and more, and it overshadows whatever "geekiness"
is found in some secret ceremony held in the dead of night or whatever. To
argue that this is why ***s and young people in general are not involved in
ham radio, IMHO, (I think I can say this--I am a *** no less) is silly!
As I've said, I've gotten plenty of enjoyment out of ham radio. If you're
interested, then you are; if you aren't, then well...you're not ... and
probably because you don't care about radio or don't feel like putting in
the effort, *** or youngster.

Enough from me...it is late and I think I am not making much sense. It's too
bad my last post on this subject was aborted; it was much better. ;)
73
Buddy Brannan, KB5ELV