Digest of Articles -- QST May 93 (Long - 42k)

Digest of Articles -- QST May 93 (Long - 42k)

Post by William E Van Hor » Wed, 30 Mar 1994 20:03:29


Digest of Articles -- QST, May, 1993

Following are digests of articles printed in the May, 1993 issue of
QST.  Such digests are being prepared for each issue of QST, and
posted periodically.  Subsequent issues will be posted one per week
until they "catch up" to the current date in mid-1994, thereafter
monthly.

It is hoped that other hams will volunteer to post similar digests of
the other ham technical publications such as QEX, CQ, 73, COMMUNICATIONS
QUARTERLY, RTTY JOURNAL, et al.  Especially desirable would be digests
of publications in other countries, such as the RSGB RADIO COMMUNICA-
TIONS and ham magazines in Europe, Japan, Australia, and other countries
around the world.  We English speakers would especially enjoy them if
they were translated into our language, but they would also be valuable
additions to the world's knowledge if they were posted in the language
of origin.  Who knows?  Some bi-lingual ham somewhere might translate
them into English and re-post them.

Worldwide communications are getting better and better.  The time has
come to make the world's ham press available to all hams throughout the
world!

The major value of digests is to give readers sufficient information to
decide whether to obtain a copy of the full text.  If any U.S. reader
wants a copy of an article in QST, please inquire of other hams in your
own neighborhood.  Many have collections of back issues.  Anyone who is
unsuccessful in finding a fellow ham with a collection should try every
library in the area, especially those at universities and technical
colleges.  If all else fails, a copy can be obtained from the ARRL
Technical Department, 225 Main St., Newington, CT 06111-1494 USA for a
fee of $3.00 per copy.  Remember, it is both cheaper and quicker to
obtain one locally.

Readers in most other countries can obtain copies from their own
national ham organizations, sometimes translated into their own
languages.
-------------------------------CUT HERE---------------------------------

COPYRIGHT NOTICE: Copyright to all the following material from QST
Magazine is held by the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), effective on
the date of issue.  Permission is granted for redistribution of the
following in its entirety, or in part, provided that this copyright
notice is not removed or altered and that proper attribution is made to
ARRL as publisher of QST, to the authors of the original articles, and
to W. E. "Van" Van Horne, W8UOF, author of this compilation.

                               _________

                           TABLE OF CONTENTS

        (line number in parentheses - counting from CUT HERE line)

TECHNICAL ARTICLES (TA)

TA1:Home-Brewing a 10 GHz. SSB/CW Transverter - Part 1              (75)
TA2:Single-Conversion Microwave SSB/CW Transceivers                (140)
TA3:Build the HANDI-Finder!                                        (203)
TA4:Add Tracking Side-Tone to Your ICOM IC-765 Transceiver         (246)
TA5:An Introduction to Amateur Television - Part 2                 (284)

PRODUCT REVIEWS (PR)

PR1:HAL Communications PCI-4000 Clover-II Controller               (324)
PR2:AlphaLab TriField Meter                                        (386)

HINTS AND KINKS (HK)

HK1:Build a Quick PVC-Supported Quad for About $50                 (421)
HK2:Installing a Huskier 160-M Fixed Capacitor in the Ten-Tec      (447)
        Titan Amplifier
HK3:Putting Variometry to Work in Matching Networks                (464)
HK4:When Antennas Should NOT Be Resonant                           (484)

TECHNICAL CORRESPONDENCE (TC)

TC1:Expanded Range DC and AC Voltmeters                            (505)

FEEDBACK (FB)

FB1:QST Apr 1993 Product Reviews                                   (530)
FB2:QST Nov 1992 "Dipoles Above Real Earth"                        (547)

NEW HAM COMPANION (NHC)

NHC1:And the Most Popular Frequency is...                          (572)
NHC2:Do You Need an Audio Filter?                                  (603)
NHC3:The Doctor is IN                                              (612)
NHC4:A Disguised Flagpole Antenna                                  (626)
NHC5:VHF/UHF Contesting                                            (634)

RADIO TIPS (RT)

RT1:What Is AMTOR?                                                 (653)
RT2:Lightning!                                                     (660)
RT3:The Ionosphere                                                 (672)
RT4:Working the World on 10-Meters                                 (681)
RT5:Is Amateur Radio Safe?                                         (694)

GENERAL INTEREST ARTICLES (GI)

GI1:Festing (Notes of a Hamologist)                                (710)
GI2:PHASE 3D - A Satellite for All -- Part 1                       (723)
GI3 Inspiration N2OVA                                              (779)
GI4:Transmitter Hunting: Tracking Down the Fun                     (797)

------------------------------------------------------------------------

TECHNICAL ARTICLES (TA)

Title>TA1:Home-Brewing a 10 GHz. SSB/CW Transverter - Part 1
Author>Lau, Zack - KH6CP
Source>QST May 1993, pp. 21-28
Abstract>First of a 2-part construction article describing a 10 GHz.
transverter.  It utilizes only readily-available parts but to build it
requires the builder to have had some experience with VHF/UHF gear and
to have access to certain test equipment.

Digest>The author has built a 10 GHz. transverter which, when used in
tandem with a 2-meter transceiver, will receive and transmit on
"X-band", or 10 GHz.  One notable thing about this project is that it
uses readily available components, nothing *** or available only from
military surplus.

He has built the transverter as a series of building blocks, each
connected with the next through plug connectors and coax jumpers. Thus,
each block can be tested independently, or changed in future upgrades.
In this first instalment, Mr. Lau supplies wiring diagrams, parts lists
including recommended sources, and construction details for the local
oscillator building blocks.

Near the beginning of the article, he addresses a question that all
interested readers must answer for themselves: "Do I have the VHF/UHF
construction experience and the test equipment required to handle this
project?"  It is his opinion that the construction details are not that
difficult and he suggests two commonly-available ham publications that
give sufficient background information to allow the average
construction-minded ham to build the equipment.  But the rub comes in
tuning the amplifiers, mixer, and filters.  He states that it should be
possible to accomplish the task with equipment reasonably available to
hams, but optimizing the circuits is much easier if one has access to
relatively sophisticated bench instrumentation, including a spectrum
analyzer.

In a side-bar with the article, Rus Healy, NJ2L, senior assistant
technical editor, recommends that anyone who has not had the experience
of building a lower-frequency transverter should do so before
undertaking the X-band project.

Conceptually, the transverter is easy enough to understand.  On the
receiver side, the 10 MHz. signal from the antenna goes through a
pre-amplifier, a band-pass filter, and into a mixer where it is
heterodyned against a local oscillator signal and converted to 144 MHz.
output.  On the transmitter side, the r.f. output from the 2-meter rig
goes to a mixer where it, also, beats against the local oscillator
signal which converts it up to 10 GHz.  From the output of the mixer,
the signal goes through a band-pass filter, an amplifier, an optional
second band-pass filter, and out to the antenna.

The "local oscillator" is actually made up of a crystal oscillator at
106.499 MHz., followed by a series of multipliers, each of which is a
separate building block and contains multiple band-pass and low-pass
filters with sufficient amplification to overcome the insertion losses.
The first building block contains the crystal oscillator and the 6:1
multiplier.  The output of that block is a spectrally-pure 639 MHz.
signal.  Following is a quadrupler block, the output of which is 2.556
GHz.  The last block within the local oscillator chain is another
quadrupler with a 10.224 GHz. output frequency.

In next month's issue will be the second, and final, installment.  It
will describe the preamplifer, mixer, and power amplifier to complete
the project.
                               _________

Title>TA2:Single-Conversiion Microwave SSB/CW Transceivers
Author>Campbell, Rick - KK7B
Source>QST May 1993, pp. 21-28
Abstract>Construction details for a microwave transceiver using receiver
and transmitter building blocks described in previous articles, plus
other components.  The transceiver can be built to operate on any band
from 432 through 5760 MHz.  On the receiver side, the design uses a
crystal-controlled converter to feed an i.f. system at 144 MHz.; that
system is, itself, a direct-conversion single-signal receiver.  The
transmitter side is a phasing-type SSB or CW transmitter.

Digest>This is another article by Mr. Campbell who described the "R2"
and "T2" PC-board building blocks in his QST articles in the issues of
January and April, 1993.  This article describes a microwave transceiver
that uses them, plus a number of other building blocks, to make a
microwave transceiver.

The first block is a "no-tune transverter" designed to be used outdoors
at the antenna, utilizing a circuit board available from Down East
Microwave Company, Troy, Maine.  For this article he used one made for
the 903 MHz. band; similar ones can be obtained from the same source for
use on bands from 432 through 5760 MHz.  In all cases, the units convert
the received microwave signals to the 144 MHz. band, and the 144 MHz.
transmitter signals to the microwave band.

Inside the shack, Mr. Campbell's system uses a direct-conversion
transceiver with 144 MHz. input and output.  The block diagram of the
2-meter transceiver shows, on ...

read more »

 
 
 

Digest of Articles -- QST May 93 (Long - 42k)

Post by William E Van Hor » Thu, 31 Mar 1994 19:34:20


Followup-To: rec.radio.amateur.misc

Digest of Articles -- QST, May, 1993

Following are digests of articles printed in the May, 1993 issue of
QST.  Such digests are being prepared for each issue of QST, and
posted periodically.  Subsequent issues will be posted one per week
until they "catch up" to the current date in mid-1994, thereafter
monthly.

It is hoped that other hams will volunteer to post similar digests of
the other ham technical publications such as QEX, CQ, 73, COMMUNICATIONS
QUARTERLY, RTTY JOURNAL, et al.  Especially desirable would be digests
of publications in other countries, such as the RSGB RADIO COMMUNICA-
TIONS and ham magazines in Europe, Japan, Australia, and other countries
around the world.  We English speakers would especially enjoy them if
they were translated into our language, but they would also be valuable
additions to the world's knowledge if they were posted in the language
of origin.  Who knows?  Some bi-lingual ham somewhere might translate
them into English and re-post them.

Worldwide communications are getting better and better.  The time has
come to make the world's ham press available to all hams throughout the
world!

The major value of digests is to give readers sufficient information to
decide whether to obtain a copy of the full text.  If any U.S. reader
wants a copy of an article in QST, please inquire of other hams in your
own neighborhood.  Many have collections of back issues.  Anyone who is
unsuccessful in finding a fellow ham with a collection should try every
library in the area, especially those at universities and technical
colleges.  If all else fails, a copy can be obtained from the ARRL
Technical Department, 225 Main St., Newington, CT 06111-1494 USA for a
fee of $3.00 per copy.  Remember, it is both cheaper and quicker to
obtain one locally.

Readers in most other countries can obtain copies from their own
national ham organizations, sometimes translated into their own
languages.
-------------------------------CUT HERE---------------------------------

COPYRIGHT NOTICE: Copyright to all the following material from QST
Magazine is held by the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), effective on
the date of issue.  Permission is granted for redistribution of the
following in its entirety, or in part, provided that this copyright
notice is not removed or altered and that proper attribution is made to
ARRL as publisher of QST, to the authors of the original articles, and
to W. E. "Van" Van Horne, W8UOF, author of this compilation.

                               _________

                           TABLE OF CONTENTS

        (line number in parentheses - counting from CUT HERE line)

TECHNICAL ARTICLES (TA)

TA1:Home-Brewing a 10 GHz. SSB/CW Transverter - Part 1              (75)
TA2:Single-Conversion Microwave SSB/CW Transceivers                (140)
TA3:Build the HANDI-Finder!                                        (203)
TA4:Add Tracking Side-Tone to Your ICOM IC-765 Transceiver         (246)
TA5:An Introduction to Amateur Television - Part 2                 (284)

PRODUCT REVIEWS (PR)

PR1:HAL Communications PCI-4000 Clover-II Controller               (324)
PR2:AlphaLab TriField Meter                                        (386)

HINTS AND KINKS (HK)

HK1:Build a Quick PVC-Supported Quad for About $50                 (421)
HK2:Installing a Huskier 160-M Fixed Capacitor in the Ten-Tec      (447)
        Titan Amplifier
HK3:Putting Variometry to Work in Matching Networks                (464)
HK4:When Antennas Should NOT Be Resonant                           (484)

TECHNICAL CORRESPONDENCE (TC)

TC1:Expanded Range DC and AC Voltmeters                            (505)

FEEDBACK (FB)

FB1:QST Apr 1993 Product Reviews                                   (530)
FB2:QST Nov 1992 "Dipoles Above Real Earth"                        (547)

NEW HAM COMPANION (NHC)

NHC1:And the Most Popular Frequency is...                          (572)
NHC2:Do You Need an Audio Filter?                                  (603)
NHC3:The Doctor is IN                                              (612)
NHC4:A Disguised Flagpole Antenna                                  (626)
NHC5:VHF/UHF Contesting                                            (634)

RADIO TIPS (RT)

RT1:What Is AMTOR?                                                 (653)
RT2:Lightning!                                                     (660)
RT3:The Ionosphere                                                 (672)
RT4:Working the World on 10-Meters                                 (681)
RT5:Is Amateur Radio Safe?                                         (694)

GENERAL INTEREST ARTICLES (GI)

GI1:Festing (Notes of a Hamologist)                                (710)
GI2:PHASE 3D - A Satellite for All -- Part 1                       (723)
GI3 Inspiration N2OVA                                              (779)
GI4:Transmitter Hunting: Tracking Down the Fun                     (797)

------------------------------------------------------------------------

TECHNICAL ARTICLES (TA)

Title>TA1:Home-Brewing a 10 GHz. SSB/CW Transverter - Part 1
Author>Lau, Zack - KH6CP
Source>QST May 1993, pp. 21-28
Abstract>First of a 2-part construction article describing a 10 GHz.
transverter.  It utilizes only readily-available parts but to build it
requires the builder to have had some experience with VHF/UHF gear and
to have access to certain test equipment.

Digest>The author has built a 10 GHz. transverter which, when used in
tandem with a 2-meter transceiver, will receive and transmit on
"X-band", or 10 GHz.  One notable thing about this project is that it
uses readily available components, nothing *** or available only from
military surplus.

He has built the transverter as a series of building blocks, each
connected with the next through plug connectors and coax jumpers. Thus,
each block can be tested independently, or changed in future upgrades.
In this first instalment, Mr. Lau supplies wiring diagrams, parts lists
including recommended sources, and construction details for the local
oscillator building blocks.

Near the beginning of the article, he addresses a question that all
interested readers must answer for themselves: "Do I have the VHF/UHF
construction experience and the test equipment required to handle this
project?"  It is his opinion that the construction details are not that
difficult and he suggests two commonly-available ham publications that
give sufficient background information to allow the average
construction-minded ham to build the equipment.  But the rub comes in
tuning the amplifiers, mixer, and filters.  He states that it should be
possible to accomplish the task with equipment reasonably available to
hams, but optimizing the circuits is much easier if one has access to
relatively sophisticated bench instrumentation, including a spectrum
analyzer.

In a side-bar with the article, Rus Healy, NJ2L, senior assistant
technical editor, recommends that anyone who has not had the experience
of building a lower-frequency transverter should do so before
undertaking the X-band project.

Conceptually, the transverter is easy enough to understand.  On the
receiver side, the 10 MHz. signal from the antenna goes through a
pre-amplifier, a band-pass filter, and into a mixer where it is
heterodyned against a local oscillator signal and converted to 144 MHz.
output.  On the transmitter side, the r.f. output from the 2-meter rig
goes to a mixer where it, also, beats against the local oscillator
signal which converts it up to 10 GHz.  From the output of the mixer,
the signal goes through a band-pass filter, an amplifier, an optional
second band-pass filter, and out to the antenna.

The "local oscillator" is actually made up of a crystal oscillator at
106.499 MHz., followed by a series of multipliers, each of which is a
separate building block and contains multiple band-pass and low-pass
filters with sufficient amplification to overcome the insertion losses.
The first building block contains the crystal oscillator and the 6:1
multiplier.  The output of that block is a spectrally-pure 639 MHz.
signal.  Following is a quadrupler block, the output of which is 2.556
GHz.  The last block within the local oscillator chain is another
quadrupler with a 10.224 GHz. output frequency.

In next month's issue will be the second, and final, installment.  It
will describe the preamplifer, mixer, and power amplifier to complete
the project.
                               _________

Title>TA2:Single-Conversiion Microwave SSB/CW Transceivers
Author>Campbell, Rick - KK7B
Source>QST May 1993, pp. 21-28
Abstract>Construction details for a microwave transceiver using receiver
and transmitter building blocks described in previous articles, plus
other components.  The transceiver can be built to operate on any band
from 432 through 5760 MHz.  On the receiver side, the design uses a
crystal-controlled converter to feed an i.f. system at 144 MHz.; that
system is, itself, a direct-conversion single-signal receiver.  The
transmitter side is a phasing-type SSB or CW transmitter.

Digest>This is another article by Mr. Campbell who described the "R2"
and "T2" PC-board building blocks in his QST articles in the issues of
January and April, 1993.  This article describes a microwave transceiver
that uses them, plus a number of other building blocks, to make a
microwave transceiver.

The first block is a "no-tune transverter" designed to be used outdoors
at the antenna, utilizing a circuit board available from Down East
Microwave Company, Troy, Maine.  For this article he used one made for
the 903 MHz. band; similar ones can be obtained from the same source for
use on bands from 432 through 5760 MHz.  In all cases, the units convert
the received microwave signals to the 144 MHz. band, and the 144 MHz.
transmitter signals to the microwave band.

Inside the shack, Mr. Campbell's system uses a direct-conversion
transceiver with 144 ...

read more »