REVIEW: TUNING IN TO R.F. SCANNING by Bob Kay, TAB BOOKS 1994

REVIEW: TUNING IN TO R.F. SCANNING by Bob Kay, TAB BOOKS 1994

Post by Michael Cresto » Sun, 23 Oct 1994 03:33:42

Review: TUNING IN TO R.F. SCANNING - from polic to satellite bands
Author: Bob Kay - TAB Books Division of McGraw-Hill Inc.  1994
ISBN: 0-07-033964-3  $14.95

This short book (150 pages) is an excellent guide for beginners to the
fascinating world of scanner radio monitoring.  It is well written in an
informative style and addresses the main questions and issues of concern to
someone with little or no knowledge of the subject.  

The first chapter is devoted to information and advice on selecting the
proper scanner to suit the listener's needs.  Authou Kay explains the
terminology and what the various specifications mean in everyday language.
In addition, he covers the different controls, functions and features of
today's popular scanning radios.  The second chapter covers the different
types of antennas, installation and most important, advice and warnings
on the subject of lightning.  Chapter three deals with coaxial cable and
connectors.

The book changes focus with the fourth chapter which is entitled Rules
and Guidelines, and covers subjects like the radio spectrum, frequency
spacing, false frequencies such as birdies and images, simplex/duplex
transmissions, repeaters, narrow and wide-band and the differences
between AM and FM.  Chapter five is devoted to scanning legalties,
including the Electronic Communications Protection Act of 1986 and state
laws that govern scanning radios.

The final chapters covers popular monitoring targets such as amateur radio,
baby monitors, business communications, news media, railroad, fast food
(no kidding!), aircraft, cordless microphones and telephones, fire, Medivac,
military, ship-to-shore, police and Federal law enforcement, outer space
and sports teams.  There's even a section on monitoring the President.  
The chapter on frequency listings contains a wealth of frequencies for the
novice to explore, and tips and advice on how to search. There's a section
on computers and scanning, clubs and magazines with a detailed listing of
addresses and contacts.  The book concludes with a question and answer
section and an index.

I was impressed by the amount of good information packed into 150 pages
and would not hesitate to recommend this book to anyone who has become
interested in monitoring the VHF and UHF radio spectrum or has just received
or purchased a scanning radio.  I only wish TUNING IN TO R.F. SCANNING had
been available when I first became interested in scanners  It would have
saved me a lot of time.

Michael Crestohl KH6KD/W1