Natural phenomena

Natural phenomena

Post by Lord Vade » Fri, 28 May 1999 04:00:00

Whenever lightning strikes near my house, the television displays a
little static. This got me to thinking, is there any specific freq.'s
that lightning can be heard on a scanner. Is there any other natural
phenomena that can be heard on a regular scanner, or do you need on of
those *** thousand dollar setups? Thanks in advance.

The Dark Lord of the Sith

 
 
 

Natural phenomena

Post by Doug Girlin » Fri, 28 May 1999 04:00:00


If you're well-heeled, you can always buy a "Stormscope" -- a piece of
aviation equipment that displays lightning strikes on a radar-like screen
(a passive "weather radar" if you like).

Doug Girling


> Whenever lightning strikes near my house, the television displays a
> little static. This got me to thinking, is there any specific freq.'s
> that lightning can be heard on a scanner. Is there any other natural
> phenomena that can be heard on a regular scanner, or do you need on of
> those *** thousand dollar setups? Thanks in advance.

> The Dark Lord of the Sith

--
"N-gauge!"  -- Capt. Jean-Luc Piccard
 
 
 

Natural phenomena

Post by Jeffrey Herm » Sat, 29 May 1999 04:00:00


Quote:>Whenever lightning strikes near my house, the television displays a
>little static. This got me to thinking, is there any specific freq.'s
>that lightning can be heard on a scanner. Is there any other natural
>phenomena that can be heard on a regular scanner, or do you need on of
>those *** thousand dollar setups? Thanks in advance.

Yes! You can evesdrop on the atmosphere if you have access to a VLF
receiver. Folks make a hobby out of listening to frequencies below
100 kHz for nature's squeals, shreeks, and whistles. Post your inquiry
to rec.radio.shortwave -- the gang on there will provide more info.

Jeff KH6O
--
Air-Raid / Civil Defense Outdoor Warning Siren:
www.cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem=108545464

 
 
 

Natural phenomena

Post by Jeffrey Herm » Sat, 29 May 1999 04:00:00


Quote:>If you're well-heeled, you can always buy a "Stormscope" -- a piece of
>aviation equipment that displays lightning strikes on a radar-like screen
>(a passive "weather radar" if you like).

Below is an old file I've hung onto for years -- I think it originated on
the QRP email list):
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: lightning detector

Way back when...i used to use a oscilloscope tube and had one dipole
orientated east and west connected to the horizontal deflection plates,
and one orientated north and south connected to the vertical plates. With
a little experimentation i could tell from what direction the
storm/lightning was coming from. All ya need is a scope tube like a 3BP1
or so and the circuit to power it up and a couple of dipoles.
                        73 Art WB9HNJ

Actually a couple of three foot diameter 50-turn loop gap antennas with
a small vertical antenna to provide a blanking signal to eliminate the
directional ambiguity (i.e. is the received signal to the north or south
of the east-west loop) will work quite well. Direction can be read from
the CRT face and relative distance can be estimated by signal strength
[ sort of :) ]. There is a site however, http://www.boltek.com that has
a more elegant solution. His system will interface to your PC, record
and display realtime strikes.
    (Second author unknown)
--------------------------------------------------------------------

You could do the above with an old TV set. I invite someone with
more experience to fill in the details. You're dealing with lethal
voltages here.

Jeff KH6O