Bestway to listen to air traffic?

Bestway to listen to air traffic?

Post by h2o.. » Wed, 10 Jul 1996 04:00:00

I live 15 miles  from 2 airports(regional). What is the best way to
listen to the air traffic flying over my house in between the 2
airports? Also, when near an international airport, what is a good
method of listening to the big boys?

Thanks for all your help,
vince

 
 
 

Bestway to listen to air traffic?

Post by Karl Schult » Wed, 10 Jul 1996 04:00:00



> I live 15 miles  from 2 airports(regional). What is the best way to
> listen to the air traffic flying over my house in between the 2
> airports? Also, when near an international airport, what is a good
> method of listening to the big boys?

One way is to simply use your scanner to scan the air band.
118-136 Mhz should be a good start.  There are some nav aids
in 108-118, but most of the voice traffic is in 118-136.

A more deterministic way is to obtain all the interesting
frequencies and program them into your scanner.  If you
have pilot friend, they'll be able to tell you what they
are.  Otherwise, try to buy or borrow some sectional
maps (pilots use them for flying) of an Airport Facilities
Directory.  Since both of these publications expire in
short regular intervals, you should be able to find old, but still
useful, editions for next to nothing.  Check with a "pilot shop"
at a local airport.

 
 
 

Bestway to listen to air traffic?

Post by Jim Christense » Wed, 10 Jul 1996 04:00:00



> > I live 15 miles  from 2 airports(regional). What is the best way to
> > listen to the air traffic flying over my house in between the 2
> > airports? Also, when near an international airport, what is a good
> > method of listening to the big boys?

> One way is to simply use your scanner to scan the air band.
> 118-136 Mhz should be a good start.  There are some nav aids
> in 108-118, but most of the voice traffic is in 118-136.

> A more deterministic way is to obtain all the interesting
> frequencies and program them into your scanner.  If you
> have pilot friend, they'll be able to tell you what they
> are.  Otherwise, try to buy or borrow some sectional
> maps (pilots use them for flying) of an Airport Facilities
> Directory.  Since both of these publications expire in
> short regular intervals, you should be able to find old, but still
> useful, editions for next to nothing.  Check with a "pilot shop"
> at a local airport.

Check my home page http://www.cp.duluth.mn.us/~jwchrist
I have an aviation page with links that will get you all the info you
could ever need
Good Luck
JIM

- Show quoted text -

 
 
 

Bestway to listen to air traffic?

Post by Michael Blankenshi » Thu, 11 Jul 1996 04:00:00



> > I live 15 miles  from 2 airports(regional). What is the best way to
> > listen to the air traffic flying over my house in between the 2
> > airports? Also, when near an international airport, what is a good
> > method of listening to the big boys?

> One way is to simply use your scanner to scan the air band.
> 118-136 Mhz should be a good start.  There are some nav aids
> in 108-118, but most of the voice traffic is in 118-136.

> A more deterministic way is to obtain all the interesting
> frequencies and program them into your scanner.  If you
> have pilot friend, they'll be able to tell you what they
> are.  Otherwise, try to buy or borrow some sectional
> maps (pilots use them for flying) of an Airport Facilities
> Directory.  Since both of these publications expire in
> short regular intervals, you should be able to find old, but still
> useful, editions for next to nothing.  Check with a "pilot shop"
> at a local airport.

Or...you could just plug in http://www.cc.gatech.edu/db1/fly/ to your
browser and get the info from the net.
 
 
 

Bestway to listen to air traffic?

Post by Carl Jansso » Thu, 11 Jul 1996 04:00:00





> > > I live 15 miles  from 2 airports(regional). What is the best way to
> > > listen to the air traffic flying over my house in between the 2
> > > airports? Also, when near an international airport, what is a good
> > > method of listening to the big boys?

This page will give you all the radio frequencies for the airports in
your area: http://www.cc.gatech.edu/db1/fly/airport-info.html .  This
includes arrival, departure, tower, ground control, etc.  

Most of the communications will be on these freqs.  The non-military
distress frequency is 121.5.  There is also a general plane to plane
"CB" frequency, but I don't remember what it is.

The major carriers also have their own frequencies for plane to plane
and plane to ground.  These are outside of the air band, ususally in the
450 MHz range, and are more to do with schedules, supplies, and
maintenance than flying.

As you listen to the departure frequencies you can write down the
regional air traffic control frequencies as they are given to the planes
("TWA271 contact Kansas City Center on 126.985").  You may not be able
to hear the controller, but you'll pick up any planes in your area that
are transmitting on those freqs.

-Carl