Longest distance for Scanner Reception

Longest distance for Scanner Reception

Post by Jim » Thu, 22 Nov 2007 12:33:14


Quote:

> Enjoying my new scanner, recently listened to the traffic generated
> after a young man
> attempting to rob a bank, was pursued and speedily captured by New
> Yorks Finest.

> I occasionally pick up New Paltz N.Y.  over 70 miles away on my Uniden
> BC 95 Scanner;

> ( Truck stuck under the toll booth )

> Even though I am ~ 300 feet above sea level, I find this remarkable.

> Go a rat shack Center loaded whip,

> am waiting for Fair Radio to send me some co-ax

> http://www.fairradio.com/catalog.php?mode=viewitem&item=1291

> so I can mount the whole thing in a window . .

> Is there any record for long distance reception on scanners;  ?

> BarnegateDx

Wait for sun spot max, you'll get lots of sporadic e, I've heard
transmissions from england & ireland on the vhf low band!
 
 
 

Longest distance for Scanner Reception

Post by Scott » Thu, 22 Nov 2007 12:49:26





> > Enjoying my new scanner, recently listened to the traffic generated
> > after a young man
> > attempting to rob a bank, was pursued and speedily captured by New
> > Yorks Finest.

> > I occasionally pick up New Paltz N.Y.  over 70 miles away on my Uniden
> > BC 95 Scanner;

> > ( Truck stuck under the toll booth )

> > Even though I am ~ 300 feet above sea level, I find this remarkable.

> > Go a rat shack Center loaded whip,

> > am waiting for Fair Radio to send me some co-ax

> > http://www.fairradio.com/catalog.php?mode=viewitem&item=1291

> > so I can mount the whole thing in a window . .

> > Is there any record for long distance reception on scanners;  ?

> > BarnegateDx

> Wait for sun spot max, you'll get lots of sporadic e, I've heard
> transmissions from england & ireland on the vhf low band!

 When's the next sun spot max?
--
'Brother Can You Spare Another Piece of Cake?'
 
 
 

Longest distance for Scanner Reception

Post by Kilgore Trout Jr » Wed, 12 Dec 2007 08:58:50

Quote:> Wait for sun spot max, you'll get lots of sporadic e, I've heard
> transmissions from england & ireland on the vhf low band!

> When's the next sun spot max?

We are at the very bottom of the solar sunspot cycle right now.
Long distance HF radio communications should improve steadily for the next
four years or so. You can check on the current solar conditions here:
http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/SolarCycle/
Keep in mind that most of the frequency bands found on a typical scanner are
too high to be greatly affected by the solar cycle.
 
 
 

Longest distance for Scanner Reception

Post by xx » Sat, 15 Dec 2007 08:06:52



Quote:> > Wait for sun spot max, you'll get lots of sporadic e, I've heard
> > transmissions from england & ireland on the vhf low band!

> > When's the next sun spot max?

> We are at the very bottom of the solar sunspot cycle right now.
> Long distance HF radio communications should improve steadily for the next
> four years or so. You can check on the current solar conditions here:
> http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/SolarCycle/
> Keep in mind that most of the frequency bands found on a typical scanner
are
> too high to be greatly affected by the solar cycle.

During the second world war, I understand that American amateurs (or
possibly CB) were picking up German inter-tank communications from North
Africa on the 27Mcs band and were relaying information back to the allied
troops in N. Africa.
 
 
 

Longest distance for Scanner Reception

Post by Scott W phony scientist extraordinair » Sat, 15 Dec 2007 09:12:23




> > > Wait for sun spot max, you'll get lots of sporadic e, I've heard
> > > transmissions from england & ireland on the vhf low band!

> > > When's the next sun spot max?

> > We are at the very bottom of the solar sunspot cycle right now.
> > Long distance HF radio communications should improve steadily for the next
> > four years or so. You can check on the current solar conditions here:
> > http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/SolarCycle/
> > Keep in mind that most of the frequency bands found on a typical scanner
> are
> > too high to be greatly affected by the solar cycle.

> During the second world war, I understand that American amateurs (or
> possibly CB) were picking up German inter-tank communications from North
> Africa on the 27Mcs band and were relaying information back to the allied
> troops in N. Africa.

 Well; it wasn't on the CB, 27 MHz AM band
 was started in 1958. I've heard stories
 about HAMs and short-wave junkies picking
 up all kinds of activity during 'the war'.
 There are STILL militarizes using the AM
 Hi Frequency band. Interesting, tho: the
 German --at least the Panzer Divisions--
 were known to broadcast on VHF-Lo in
 FM. Someone correct me if I'm wrong on this.
--
"...To build may have to be the slow and
laborious task of years. To destroy can be
the thoughtless act of a single day.."

Sir Winston Churchill

And, 500,000 Patagonian Pygmies nod their heads
in total agreement.
http://tinyurl.com/2b2bk7
http://tinyurl.com/2b2bk7
http://tinyurl.com/2b2bk7

 
 
 

Longest distance for Scanner Reception

Post by Davi » Sat, 15 Dec 2007 13:26:26


Quote:

>  Well; it wasn't on the CB, 27 MHz AM band
>  was started in 1958. I've heard stories
>  about HAMs and short-wave junkies picking
>  up all kinds of activity during 'the war'.
>  There are STILL militarizes using the AM
>  Hi Frequency band. Interesting, tho: the
>  German --at least the Panzer Divisions--
>  were known to broadcast on VHF-Lo in
>  FM. Someone correct me if I'm wrong on this.

HF and VHF-Low are adjacent and have overlapping characteristics ca. 30 mHz.
 
 
 

Longest distance for Scanner Reception

Post by Scott W phony scientist extraordinair » Sat, 15 Dec 2007 14:26:23



> >  Well; it wasn't on the CB, 27 MHz AM band
> >  was started in 1958. I've heard stories
> >  about HAMs and short-wave junkies picking
> >  up all kinds of activity during 'the war'.
> >  There are STILL militarizes using the AM
> >  Hi Frequency band. Interesting, tho: the
> >  German --at least the Panzer Divisions--
> >  were known to broadcast on VHF-Lo in
> >  FM. Someone correct me if I'm wrong on this.

> HF and VHF-Low are adjacent and have overlapping characteristics ca. 30 mHz.

 Sure, but wouldn't 'FM Mode' negate some of the skip
 pattern?
--
"...To build may have to be the slow and
laborious task of years. To destroy can be
the thoughtless act of a single day.."

Sir Winston Churchill

And, 500,000 Patagonian Pygmies nod their heads
in total agreement.
http://tinyurl.com/2b2bk7
http://tinyurl.com/2b2bk7
http://tinyurl.com/2b2bk7

 
 
 

Longest distance for Scanner Reception

Post by Jim » Sat, 15 Dec 2007 18:20:36

Quote:

>  Sure, but wouldn't 'FM Mode' negate some of the skip  pattern?

AM - FM - SSB - CW, what ever has no effect on the skip (propagation)
conditions. WE, our radio club receive "skip" on our FM ham repeater which
is in the 147 MHz band. The usual skip comes from 500 miles away from
another ham repeater.

Longest scanner reception would depend on several conditions,  the antenna,
it's height, your elevation, propagation conditions, coax line loss, antenna
signal amplifier, just a few of the major items to think about.

 
 
 

Longest distance for Scanner Reception

Post by Hank » Sun, 16 Dec 2007 07:35:29




> > > Wait for sun spot max, you'll get lots of sporadic e, I've heard
> > > transmissions from england & ireland on the vhf low band!

> > > When's the next sun spot max?

> > We are at the very bottom of the solar sunspot cycle right now.
> > Long distance HF radio communications should improve steadily for the
next
> > four years or so. You can check on the current solar conditions here:
> > http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/SolarCycle/
> > Keep in mind that most of the frequency bands found on a typical scanner
> are
> > too high to be greatly affected by the solar cycle.

> During the second world war, I understand that American amateurs (or
> possibly CB) were picking up German inter-tank communications from North
> Africa on the 27Mcs band and were relaying information back to the allied
> troops in N. Africa.

I was around during the big war and remember going into my neighbor's house.
They had this big Zenith floor model which had a shortwave band.  I remember
hearing 'action' in English (must have been our's).  Sounded like a plane
going down.

HankG

- Show quoted text -

 
 
 

Longest distance for Scanner Reception

Post by Bearcat210xl » Sun, 16 Dec 2007 08:57:28






> > > > Wait for sun spot max, you'll get lots of sporadic e, I've heard
> > > > transmissions from england & ireland on the vhf low band!

> > > > When's the next sun spot max?

> > > We are at the very bottom of the solar sunspot cycle right now.
> > > Long distance HF radio communications should improve steadily for the
> next
> > > four years or so. You can check on the current solar conditions here:
> > >http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/SolarCycle/
> > > Keep in mind that most of the frequency bands found on a typical scanner
> > are
> > > too high to be greatly affected by the solar cycle.

> > During the second world war, I understand that American amateurs (or
> > possibly CB) were picking up German inter-tank communications from North
> > Africa on the 27Mcs band and were relaying information back to the allied
> > troops in N. Africa.

> I was around during the big war and remember going into my neighbor's house.
> They had this big Zenith floor model which had a shortwave band.  I remember
> hearing 'action' in English (must have been our's).  Sounded like a plane
> going down.

> HankG

> - Hide quoted text -

> - Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -

> - Show quoted text -

I live in the New Brunswick area, and my Bearcat 210Xlt has picked up
transmissions from Quebec! (Or so I assume, for whoever is talking
speaks french.) Thats around 800 km!
 
 
 

Longest distance for Scanner Reception

Post by Scott W phony scientist extraordinair » Sun, 16 Dec 2007 09:41:09


Quote:

> >  Sure, but wouldn't 'FM Mode' negate some of the skip  pattern?

> AM - FM - SSB - CW, what ever has no effect on the skip (propagation)
> conditions. WE, our radio club receive "skip" on our FM ham repeater which
> is in the 147 MHz band. The usual skip comes from 500 miles away from
> another ham repeater.

> Longest scanner reception would depend on several conditions,  the antenna,
> it's height, your elevation, propagation conditions, coax line loss, antenna
> signal amplifier, just a few of the major items to think about.

 Ok. I thought that they way that they signal was modulated
 had an affect on the general overall range, all things considered
 with AM working out more favorably with skip because it's a simpler
 type of radiation. But come to think of it, when the US Govmnt
 was doing below-ground nucleor tests in Nevada, we could pick
 up tv channel's from 1000 miles away.
--
"...To build may have to be the slow and
laborious task of years. To destroy can be
the thoughtless act of a single day.."

Sir Winston Churchill

And, 500,000 Patagonian Pygmies nod their heads
in total agreement.
http://tinyurl.com/2b2bk7
http://tinyurl.com/2b2bk7
http://tinyurl.com/2b2bk7

 
 
 

Longest distance for Scanner Reception

Post by Scott W phony scientist extraordinair » Sun, 16 Dec 2007 09:42:40







> > > > > Wait for sun spot max, you'll get lots of sporadic e, I've heard
> > > > > transmissions from england & ireland on the vhf low band!

> > > > > When's the next sun spot max?

> > > > We are at the very bottom of the solar sunspot cycle right now.
> > > > Long distance HF radio communications should improve steadily for the
> > next
> > > > four years or so. You can check on the current solar conditions here:
> > > >http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/SolarCycle/
> > > > Keep in mind that most of the frequency bands found on a typical scanner
> > > are
> > > > too high to be greatly affected by the solar cycle.

> > > During the second world war, I understand that American amateurs (or
> > > possibly CB) were picking up German inter-tank communications from North
> > > Africa on the 27Mcs band and were relaying information back to the allied
> > > troops in N. Africa.

> > I was around during the big war and remember going into my neighbor's house.
> > They had this big Zenith floor model which had a shortwave band.  I remember
> > hearing 'action' in English (must have been our's).  Sounded like a plane
> > going down.

> > HankG

> > - Hide quoted text -

> > - Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -

> > - Show quoted text -

> I live in the New Brunswick area, and my Bearcat 210Xlt has picked up
> transmissions from Quebec! (Or so I assume, for whoever is talking
> speaks french.) Thats around 800 km!

 I could pick up CHIPS and Mexican Military on my Bearcat
 when I was in Dallas. This must have been around the mid
 90's. Of course, back then, with the solar flare-up waning
 off, you could still pick up CHIPS (california highway
 patrol) who inccidently transmits on FM or I woulnd't have
 been able to recieve them.
--
"...To build may have to be the slow and
laborious task of years. To destroy can be
the thoughtless act of a single day.."

Sir Winston Churchill

And, 500,000 Patagonian Pygmies nod their heads
in total agreement.
http://tinyurl.com/2b2bk7
http://tinyurl.com/2b2bk7
http://tinyurl.com/2b2bk7

 
 
 

Longest distance for Scanner Reception

Post by Bearcat210xl » Tue, 18 Dec 2007 00:25:12

On Dec 14, 8:42 pm, Scott W phony scientist extraordinaire








> > > > > > Wait for sun spot max, you'll get lots of sporadic e, I've heard
> > > > > > transmissions from england & ireland on the vhf low band!

> > > > > > When's the next sun spot max?

> > > > > We are at the very bottom of the solar sunspot cycle right now.
> > > > > Long distance HF radio communications should improve steadily for the
> > > next
> > > > > four years or so. You can check on the current solar conditions here:
> > > > >http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/SolarCycle/
> > > > > Keep in mind that most of the frequency bands found on a typical scanner
> > > > are
> > > > > too high to be greatly affected by the solar cycle.

> > > > During the second world war, I understand that American amateurs (or
> > > > possibly CB) were picking up German inter-tank communications from North
> > > > Africa on the 27Mcs band and were relaying information back to the allied
> > > > troops in N. Africa.

> > > I was around during the big war and remember going into my neighbor's house.
> > > They had this big Zenith floor model which had a shortwave band.  I remember
> > > hearing 'action' in English (must have been our's).  Sounded like a plane
> > > going down.

> > > HankG

> > > - Hide quoted text -

> > > - Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -

> > > - Show quoted text -

> > I live in the New Brunswick area, and my Bearcat 210Xlt has picked up
> > transmissions from Quebec! (Or so I assume, for whoever is talking
> > speaks french.) Thats around 800 km!

>  I could pick up CHIPS and Mexican Military on my Bearcat
>  when I was in Dallas. This must have been around the mid
>  90's. Of course, back then, with the solar flare-up waning
>  off, you could still pick up CHIPS (california highway
>  patrol) who inccidently transmits on FM or I woulnd't have
>  been able to recieve them.
> --
> "...To build may have to be the slow and
> laborious task of years. To destroy can be
> the thoughtless act of a single day.."

> Sir Winston Churchill

> And, 500,000 Patagonian Pygmies nod their heads
> in total agreement.http://tinyurl.com/2b2bk7http://tinyurl.com/2b2bk7http://tinyurl.com/... Hide quoted text -

> - Show quoted text -

The problem is, i'm using the two-foot long telescoping antenna that
came with the radio, so it wouldn't have been possible to pick up
transmissions from no more than a couple hundred miles!
 
 
 

Longest distance for Scanner Reception

Post by Scott W phony scientist extraordinair » Tue, 18 Dec 2007 08:32:11


> On Dec 14, 8:42 pm, Scott W phony scientist extraordinaire







> > > > > > > Wait for sun spot max, you'll get lots of sporadic e, I've heard
> > > > > > > transmissions from england & ireland on the vhf low band!

> > > > > > > When's the next sun spot max?

> > > > > > We are at the very bottom of the solar sunspot cycle right now.
> > > > > > Long distance HF radio communications should improve steadily for the
> > > > next
> > > > > > four years or so. You can check on the current solar conditions here:
> > > > > >http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/SolarCycle/
> > > > > > Keep in mind that most of the frequency bands found on a typical scanner
> > > > > are
> > > > > > too high to be greatly affected by the solar cycle.

> > > > > During the second world war, I understand that American amateurs (or
> > > > > possibly CB) were picking up German inter-tank communications from North
> > > > > Africa on the 27Mcs band and were relaying information back to the allied
> > > > > troops in N. Africa.

> > > > I was around during the big war and remember going into my neighbor's house.
> > > > They had this big Zenith floor model which had a shortwave band.  I remember
> > > > hearing 'action' in English (must have been our's).  Sounded like a plane
> > > > going down.

> > > > HankG

> > > > - Hide quoted text -

> > > > - Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -

> > > > - Show quoted text -

> > > I live in the New Brunswick area, and my Bearcat 210Xlt has picked up
> > > transmissions from Quebec! (Or so I assume, for whoever is talking
> > > speaks french.) Thats around 800 km!

> >  I could pick up CHIPS and Mexican Military on my Bearcat
> >  when I was in Dallas. This must have been around the mid
> >  90's. Of course, back then, with the solar flare-up waning
> >  off, you could still pick up CHIPS (california highway
> >  patrol) who inccidently transmits on FM or I woulnd't have
> >  been able to recieve them.
> > --
> > "...To build may have to be the slow and
> > laborious task of years. To destroy can be
> > the thoughtless act of a single day.."

> > Sir Winston Churchill

> > And, 500,000 Patagonian Pygmies nod their heads
> > in total agreement.http://tinyurl.com/2b2bk7http://tinyurl.com/2b2bk7http://tinyurl.com/... Hide quoted text -

> > - Show quoted text -

> The problem is, i'm using the two-foot long telescoping antenna that
> came with the radio, so it wouldn't have been possible to pick up
> transmissions from no more than a couple hundred miles!

 It *could*. I've hooked up my old Starlite Shortwave
 radio to a magnetic mount CB antenna and could pickup
 stations in Africa. just depends on how strong the
 signal is and the conditions?
--
"...To build may have to be the slow and
laborious task of years. To destroy can be
the thoughtless act of a single day.."

Sir Winston Churchill

And, 500,000 Patagonian Pygmies nod their heads
in total agreement.
http://tinyurl.com/2b2bk7
http://tinyurl.com/2b2bk7
http://tinyurl.com/2b2bk7

 
 
 

Longest distance for Scanner Reception

Post by Davi » Tue, 18 Dec 2007 10:24:22


> On Dec 14, 8:42 pm, Scott W phony scientist extraordinaire







>>>>>>> Wait for sun spot max, you'll get lots of sporadic e, I've heard
>>>>>>> transmissions from england & ireland on the vhf low band!
>>>>>>> When's the next sun spot max?
>>>>>> We are at the very bottom of the solar sunspot cycle right now.
>>>>>> Long distance HF radio communications should improve steadily for the
>>>> next
>>>>>> four years or so. You can check on the current solar conditions here:
>>>>>> http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/SolarCycle/
>>>>>> Keep in mind that most of the frequency bands found on a typical scanner
>>>>> are
>>>>>> too high to be greatly affected by the solar cycle.
>>>>> During the second world war, I understand that American amateurs (or
>>>>> possibly CB) were picking up German inter-tank communications from North
>>>>> Africa on the 27Mcs band and were relaying information back to the allied
>>>>> troops in N. Africa.
>>>> I was around during the big war and remember going into my neighbor's house.
>>>> They had this big Zenith floor model which had a shortwave band.  I remember
>>>> hearing 'action' in English (must have been our's).  Sounded like a plane
>>>> going down.
>>>> HankG
>>>> - Hide quoted text -
>>>> - Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -
>>>> - Show quoted text -
>>> I live in the New Brunswick area, and my Bearcat 210Xlt has picked up
>>> transmissions from Quebec! (Or so I assume, for whoever is talking
>>> speaks french.) Thats around 800 km!
>>  I could pick up CHIPS and Mexican Military on my Bearcat
>>  when I was in Dallas. This must have been around the mid
>>  90's. Of course, back then, with the solar flare-up waning
>>  off, you could still pick up CHIPS (california highway
>>  patrol) who inccidently transmits on FM or I woulnd't have
>>  been able to recieve them.
>> --
>> "...To build may have to be the slow and
>> laborious task of years. To destroy can be
>> the thoughtless act of a single day.."

>> Sir Winston Churchill

>> And, 500,000 Patagonian Pygmies nod their heads
>> in total agreement.http://tinyurl.com/2b2bk7http://tinyurl.com/2b2bk7http://tinyurl.com/... Hide quoted text -

>> - Show quoted text -

> The problem is, i'm using the two-foot long telescoping antenna that
> came with the radio, so it wouldn't have been possible to pick up
> transmissions from no more than a couple hundred miles!

Not necessarily.