Newspaper quoting traffic heard on a scanner

Newspaper quoting traffic heard on a scanner

Post by Mark D. Conn » Thu, 03 Nov 1994 02:08:06

In an article about the Americal Eagle crash here in Indiana
yesterday, our local paper had a quote from an Indiana State Police
officer who was talking on the radio.  He was describing something or
other about the crash site.  The article was explicit in saying this
was ISP radio traffic.

Isn't this illegal, even for newspapers?  I was under the impression
that the 1934 Communications Act prevented the use or publication of
*any* radio traffic (except amateur and broadcast).  Can someone quote
me the sections out of this Act that covers this?

BTW, this is the same paper that complained about police officers that
used scanners to gather info about drug dealers that used cordless
phones.

--
Mark D. Conner  - N9XTN                 Opinions expressed here are
Dept. of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences       not necessarily those of the
Purdue Univ., W. Lafayette IN 47907     Government, DoD, Purdue, or

 
 
 

Newspaper quoting traffic heard on a scanner

Post by SCAN9 » Fri, 04 Nov 1994 12:37:04



Quote:(Mark D. Conner) writes:
>In an article about the Americal Eagle crash here in Indiana
>yesterday, our local paper had a quote from an Indiana State Police
>officer who was talking on the radio.  He was describing something or
>other about the crash site.  The article was explicit in saying this
>was ISP radio traffic.
>Isn't this illegal, even for newspapers?  I was under the impression
>that the 1934 Communications Act prevented the use or publication of
>*any* radio traffic (except amateur and broadcast).  Can someone quote
>me the sections out of this Act that covers this?
>BTW, this is the same paper that complained about police officers that
>used scanners to gather info about drug dealers that used cordless
>phones.

Mark,

I was a newspaper editor for 20 years.  I would never let a reporter quote
radio traffic off the scanner.  In fact, no information should be used
without verifying it first.

As to the Comm Act of 1934, it does not prohibit the publication of comms
heard.  It DOES, however, prohibit the use of what ones hears on the
airwaves for monetary gain.  One might argue that the newspaper is a
for-profit enterprise and it is making money off what it hears by
publishing it.  The law also states that one may not divulge to others
what is heard.  So you kind of have two violations there.  However, in all
honesty, I don't think you will see anything done about it unless the
police themselves complain.  Even then, I'm sure not much would come of
it.

Not too many newspaper editors are aware of the Comm Act of 1934.  

Chuck Gysi, N2DUP

 
 
 

Newspaper quoting traffic heard on a scanner

Post by Jamie Hanrahan, Kernel Mode Syste » Sun, 06 Nov 1994 21:21:29


> As to the Comm Act of 1934, it does not prohibit the publication of comms
> heard.  It DOES, however, prohibit the use of what ones hears on the
> airwaves for monetary gain.  One might argue that the newspaper is a
> for-profit enterprise and it is making money off what it hears by
> publishing it.  The law also states that one may not divulge to others
> what is heard.  

And publishing doesn't count as "divulging to others"?  Think again.  

        --- Jamie Hanrahan, Kernel Mode Systems, San Diego CA

 
 
 

Newspaper quoting traffic heard on a scanner

Post by SCAN9 » Tue, 08 Nov 1994 11:30:48


Quote:Kernel Mode Systems) writes:
>And publishing doesn't count as "divulging to others"?  Think again.  

Jamie, That's what I was trying to say.  

Chuck

 
 
 

Newspaper quoting traffic heard on a scanner

Post by Andy Domonk » Wed, 09 Nov 1994 01:26:04


> And publishing doesn't count as "divulging to others"?  Think again.  

>    --- Jamie Hanrahan, Kernel Mode Systems, San Diego CA


The media will do whatever it seems fit (or politically correct at the time.
Corporations own the government and the media, end of story.

Andy

 
 
 

Newspaper quoting traffic heard on a scanner

Post by Jason Edmist » Wed, 09 Nov 1994 15:00:22



>> As to the Comm Act of 1934, it does not prohibit the publication of comms
>> heard.  It DOES, however, prohibit the use of what ones hears on the
>> airwaves for monetary gain.  One might argue that the newspaper is a
>> for-profit enterprise and it is making money off what it hears by
>> publishing it.  The law also states that one may not divulge to others
>> what is heard.  
>And publishing doesn't count as "divulging to others"?  Think again.  

The paper would gleefuly tell you that they are protected by the First
Amendment, "freedom of the press", wich supersedes any legislation.