OT May be of interest

OT May be of interest

Post by Burr » Mon, 17 Nov 2003 23:29:30

Dear Friends and Family:

I hope that you will spare me a few minutes of your time to tell you about
something that I saw on Monday, October 27.

I had been attending a conference in Annapolis and was coming home on
Sunday.

As you may recall, Los Angeles International Airport was closed on Sunday,
October 26, because of the fires that affected air traffic control.
Accordingly, my flight, and many others, were canceled and I wound up
spending a night in Baltimore.

My story begins the next day.

When I went to check in at the United counter Monday morning I saw a lot of
soldiers home from Iraq. Most were very young and all had on their desert
camouflage uniforms. This was as change from earlier, when they had to buy
civilian clothes in Kuwait to fly home. It was a visible reminder that we
are in a war. It probably was pretty close to what train terminals were
like in World War II.

Many people were stopping the troops to talk to them, asking them questions
in the Starbucks line or just saying "Welcome Home." In addition to all the
flights that had been canceled on Sunday, the weather was terrible in
Baltimore and the flights were backed up. So, there were a lot of unhappy
people in the terminal trying to get home, but nobody that I saw gave the
soldiers a bad time.

By the afternoon, one plane to Denver had been delayed several hours.
United personnel kept asking for volunteers to give up their seats and take
another flight. They weren't getting many takers.

Finally, a United spokeswoman got on the PA and said this, "Folks. As you
can see, there are a lot of soldiers in the waiting area. They only have 14
days of leave and we're trying to get them where they need to go without
spending any more time in an airport then they have to. We sold them all
tickets, knowing we would oversell the flight. If we can, we want to get
them all on this flight. We want all the soldiers to know that we respect
what you're doing, we are here for you and we love you."

At that, the entire terminal of cranky, tired, travel-weary people, a
cross-section of America, broke into sustained and heartfelt applause. The
soldiers looked surprised and very modest. Most of them just looked at
their boots. Many of us were wiping away tears.

And, yes, people lined up to take the later flight and all the soldiers
went to Denver on that flight.

That little moment made me proud to be an American, and also told me why we
will win this war.

If you want to send my little story on to your friends and family, feel
free. This is not some urban legend. I was there, I was part of it, I saw
it happen.

Will Ross
Administrative Judge
United States Department of Defense

 
 
 

OT May be of interest

Post by Clifton T. Sharp Jr » Tue, 18 Nov 2003 04:14:06



> And, yes, people lined up to take the later flight and all the soldiers
> went to Denver on that flight.

That was great! Glad you told the story.

--
"Look, we have exhausted virtually all our diplomatic effort to get the Iraqis
to comply with their own agreements and with international law. Given that,
what other option is there but to force them to do so?"
  -- Tom Daschle, Feb. 11, 1998

 
 
 

OT May be of interest

Post by Jim Dougla » Tue, 18 Nov 2003 06:03:38

All warm and fuzzy till you look at the return address. Would Will Ross, a
judge for the department of defense have an email address of


Quote:> Dear Friends and Family:

> I hope that you will spare me a few minutes of your time to tell you about
> something that I saw on Monday, October 27.

> I had been attending a conference in Annapolis and was coming home on
> Sunday.

> As you may recall, Los Angeles International Airport was closed on Sunday,
> October 26, because of the fires that affected air traffic control.
> Accordingly, my flight, and many others, were canceled and I wound up
> spending a night in Baltimore.

> My story begins the next day.

> When I went to check in at the United counter Monday morning I saw a lot
of
> soldiers home from Iraq. Most were very young and all had on their desert
> camouflage uniforms. This was as change from earlier, when they had to buy
> civilian clothes in Kuwait to fly home. It was a visible reminder that we
> are in a war. It probably was pretty close to what train terminals were
> like in World War II.

> Many people were stopping the troops to talk to them, asking them
questions
> in the Starbucks line or just saying "Welcome Home." In addition to all
the
> flights that had been canceled on Sunday, the weather was terrible in
> Baltimore and the flights were backed up. So, there were a lot of unhappy
> people in the terminal trying to get home, but nobody that I saw gave the
> soldiers a bad time.

> By the afternoon, one plane to Denver had been delayed several hours.
> United personnel kept asking for volunteers to give up their seats and
take
> another flight. They weren't getting many takers.

> Finally, a United spokeswoman got on the PA and said this, "Folks. As you
> can see, there are a lot of soldiers in the waiting area. They only have
14
> days of leave and we're trying to get them where they need to go without
> spending any more time in an airport then they have to. We sold them all
> tickets, knowing we would oversell the flight. If we can, we want to get
> them all on this flight. We want all the soldiers to know that we respect
> what you're doing, we are here for you and we love you."

> At that, the entire terminal of cranky, tired, travel-weary people, a
> cross-section of America, broke into sustained and heartfelt applause. The
> soldiers looked surprised and very modest. Most of them just looked at
> their boots. Many of us were wiping away tears.

> And, yes, people lined up to take the later flight and all the soldiers
> went to Denver on that flight.

> That little moment made me proud to be an American, and also told me why
we
> will win this war.

> If you want to send my little story on to your friends and family, feel
> free. This is not some urban legend. I was there, I was part of it, I saw
> it happen.

> Will Ross
> Administrative Judge
> United States Department of Defense

 
 
 

OT May be of interest

Post by Burr » Tue, 18 Nov 2003 06:21:24

That's my Return address!!! If you want to write me you have to remove
"panties"

> All warm and fuzzy till you look at the return address. Would Will Ross, a
> judge for the department of defense have an email address of



>>Dear Friends and Family:

>>I hope that you will spare me a few minutes of your time to tell you about
>>something that I saw on Monday, October 27.

>>I had been attending a conference in Annapolis and was coming home on
>>Sunday.

>>As you may recall, Los Angeles International Airport was closed on Sunday,
>>October 26, because of the fires that affected air traffic control.
>>Accordingly, my flight, and many others, were canceled and I wound up
>>spending a night in Baltimore.

>>My story begins the next day.

>>When I went to check in at the United counter Monday morning I saw a lot

> of

>>soldiers home from Iraq. Most were very young and all had on their desert
>>camouflage uniforms. This was as change from earlier, when they had to buy
>>civilian clothes in Kuwait to fly home. It was a visible reminder that we
>>are in a war. It probably was pretty close to what train terminals were
>>like in World War II.

>>Many people were stopping the troops to talk to them, asking them

> questions

>>in the Starbucks line or just saying "Welcome Home." In addition to all

> the

>>flights that had been canceled on Sunday, the weather was terrible in
>>Baltimore and the flights were backed up. So, there were a lot of unhappy
>>people in the terminal trying to get home, but nobody that I saw gave the
>>soldiers a bad time.

>>By the afternoon, one plane to Denver had been delayed several hours.
>>United personnel kept asking for volunteers to give up their seats and

> take

>>another flight. They weren't getting many takers.

>>Finally, a United spokeswoman got on the PA and said this, "Folks. As you
>>can see, there are a lot of soldiers in the waiting area. They only have

> 14

>>days of leave and we're trying to get them where they need to go without
>>spending any more time in an airport then they have to. We sold them all
>>tickets, knowing we would oversell the flight. If we can, we want to get
>>them all on this flight. We want all the soldiers to know that we respect
>>what you're doing, we are here for you and we love you."

>>At that, the entire terminal of cranky, tired, travel-weary people, a
>>cross-section of America, broke into sustained and heartfelt applause. The
>>soldiers looked surprised and very modest. Most of them just looked at
>>their boots. Many of us were wiping away tears.

>>And, yes, people lined up to take the later flight and all the soldiers
>>went to Denver on that flight.

>>That little moment made me proud to be an American, and also told me why

> we

>>will win this war.

>>If you want to send my little story on to your friends and family, feel
>>free. This is not some urban legend. I was there, I was part of it, I saw
>>it happen.

>>Will Ross
>>Administrative Judge
>>United States Department of Defense