Dallas PD radio traffic via RealAudio

Dallas PD radio traffic via RealAudio

Post by D Sta » Sat, 09 Nov 1996 04:00:00


>Apparently it's just a scanner. Stops on the next active channel it finds.
>And nobody seems to have explained why they claim 16 when Dallas only has
>12 (not counting the frequencies they use illegally).

Unless they're using ham, marine or aircraft frequencies
without a license, or running more than portable power on
any other frequency, how can they be using frequencies
"illegally"?  Police agencies can use almost any frequency
they want, without a license, if they run very low power.  
It's in the FCC regs.

73 de Dave, NF2G

 
 
 

Dallas PD radio traffic via RealAudio

Post by Lyn Kenne » Sat, 09 Nov 1996 04:00:00





>>Apparently it's just a scanner. Stops on the next active channel it finds.
>>And nobody seems to have explained why they claim 16 when Dallas only has
>>12 (not counting the frequencies they use illegally).

>Unless they're using ham, marine or aircraft frequencies
>without a license, or running more than portable power on
>any other frequency, how can they be using frequencies
>"illegally"?  Police agencies can use almost any frequency
>they want, without a license, if they run very low power.  
>It's in the FCC regs.

Admittedly, my copy is a few years old but 47CFR90.19(g)(3) says the
frequencies listed in paragraph (d) are available for low-power use.
Only those between 40 MHz and 952 MHz. The maximum power is 2 watts.
So the 100-watt mobiles are not legal. Neither are the frequencies
normally not for police use. And it requires the users to identify.

Needless to say, Dallas is not the only PD that doesn't abide by the
rules.

--  ---------------------------------------------------------------------

| Lyn Kennedy    webpage      | http://webusers.anet-dfw.com/~lrkn/     |
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Dallas PD radio traffic via RealAudio

Post by D Sta » Sun, 10 Nov 1996 04:00:00


>Only those between 40 MHz and 952 MHz. The maximum power is 2 watts.

What frequencies are they using below 40 MHz or above 952
MHz?

Quote:>So the 100-watt mobiles are not legal. Neither are the frequencies
>normally not for police use. And it requires the users to identify.

I believe the identification rules pertain only to
licensees, not to those using the frequencies under Part 15
or law enforcement exemptions.

Also, 100-watt mobiles are rare in public safety. The few
that exist operate on VHF-low (below 50 MHz).  The average
police car transmits with between 5 and 50 watts.

Granted, that still exceeds the "low power" limits, but if
you're going to make accusations, at least be factual.

73 de Dave, NF2G

 
 
 

Dallas PD radio traffic via RealAudio

Post by David Ma » Tue, 12 Nov 1996 04:00:00

Police agencies are allowed to use ANY public service bands in
their city that are not being used by other city departments.
Thus, if a channel is licensed to a city's service department,
but that department doesn't use it, the police may LEGALLY make
use of that channel.

That's the law.

That also means they may use an active channel licensed to another
city department whenever that department isn't using it, such as
using the garbage collection channel at night when the garbage
crews aren't working.  In fact, to be technical about it, since
only one person can use a channel at one time, the police can
use any city channel.  After all, at the moment the police and
dispatcher are transmitting, the other city department licensed
to that channel isn't using it.

As for legal ID's...someone said stations must identify themselves
every 30 minutes.  Not true.  Stations must identify themselves
every time they begin transmitting.  If a city's dispatch service
is identified as KQA 934 (just an example, don't go looking to see
who KQA 934 is...or if it even exists), as soon as a broadcast
from dispatch begins with, "934 to car 12," it has legally identified
itself.

Stations that transmit continuously (no break in the carrier) are
required to identify themselves once an hour as close to the top
of the hour as possible.  The automatic morse code broadcasters
that automatically run a coded ID every 10:00 or so cover a
licensee's backside in case the radio operators don't identify
themselves as required.

Someone also wrote asking why the use of Morse code when nobody
uses Morse code these days.  Obviously, somebody uses Morse code.
It's just that the person who wrote that isn't one of those people.

--

 
 
 

Dallas PD radio traffic via RealAudio

Post by Jason L » Wed, 13 Nov 1996 04:00:00



>Police agencies are allowed to use ANY public service bands in
>their city that are not being used by other city departments.
>Thus, if a channel is licensed to a city's service department,
>but that department doesn't use it, the police may LEGALLY make
>use of that channel.

>That's the law.

FWIW, I don't believe that that's 'the law' in Canada, which also
receives this international newsgroup.

Quote:>As for legal ID's...someone said stations must identify themselves
>every 30 minutes.  Not true.  Stations must identify themselves

..at least once per hour, in this neck of the woods. Two frequencies of
the local FD's 9 broadcast a Morse ID every 44 minutes 30 seconds
(don't know why the odd number, I was thinking clock drift myself).

 Jay

 
 
 

Dallas PD radio traffic via RealAudio

Post by D Sta » Thu, 14 Nov 1996 04:00:00




>>Police agencies are allowed to use ANY public service bands in
>>their city that are not being used by other city departments.
>>Thus, if a channel is licensed to a city's service department,
>>but that department doesn't use it, the police may LEGALLY make
>>use of that channel.

>>That's the law.

>FWIW, I don't believe that that's 'the law' in Canada, which also
>receives this international newsgroup.

So?  We were discussing Dallas, TX, which was not located in
Canada the last time I looked.

Yes, we need to be sensitive to the international nature of
the newsgroup, but let's not be overly sensitive, OK?

73 de Dave, NF2G

 
 
 

Dallas PD radio traffic via RealAudio

Post by Jim » Thu, 14 Nov 1996 04:00:00

 >

 >
 > >Only those between 40 MHz and 952 MHz. The maximum power is 2 watts.
 >
 > What frequencies are they using below 40 MHz or above 952
 > MHz?
 >
 > >So the 100-watt mobiles are not legal. Neither are the frequencies
 > >normally not for police use. And it requires the users to identify.
 >
 > I believe the identification rules pertain only to
 > licensees, not to those using the frequencies under Part 15
 > or law enforcement exemptions.
 >
 > Also, 100-watt mobiles are rare in public safety. The few
         ^^^^^^^^

Ahhh ... beg to differ strongly, Dave. I've still got 100 W VHF
(both low and hi band) and UHF Mitreks and they made (until a
few years ago) 100 Watt Syntors XX9000 (these are all Motorola
commercial radios).

Jim

 > that exist operate on VHF-low (below 50 MHz).  The average
 > police car transmits with between 5 and 50 watts.
 >
 > Granted, that still exceeds the "low power" limits, but if
 > you're going to make accusations, at least be factual.
 >
 > 73 de Dave, NF2G

 
 
 

Dallas PD radio traffic via RealAudio

Post by D Sta » Fri, 15 Nov 1996 04:00:00


> > Also, 100-watt mobiles are rare in public safety. The few
>         ^^^^^^^^

>Ahhh ... beg to differ strongly, Dave. I've still got 100 W VHF
>(both low and hi band) and UHF Mitreks and they made (until a
>few years ago) 100 Watt Syntors XX9000 (these are all Motorola
>commercial radios).

I got a double response from you (email and newsgroup), so
you'll see two replies, too.  :-)

I should have said that they aren't common where I am.  Of
course, here in western NY we don't need to transmit across
Texas.   :-)