And on another note.. 2 meters

And on another note.. 2 meters

Post by Mike » Sun, 23 Jul 2000 04:00:00

Having been a HAM sice 1968, I hate to admit that I have  NEVER worked 2
meters.  I won a Radio Shack HTX 245  2meter / 70 cm HT.  Sharp looking
little HT.  Looks like it could be a lot of fun.  Anyone point me to a good
publication or primer on 2 meter operations?

Thanks
Mike

 
 
 

And on another note.. 2 meters

Post by Jeff » Sun, 23 Jul 2000 04:00:00


2 meter CB is like 11 meter CB, you have to listen to it for a
while before you can pick up the lingo.

Jeff
KA1OGM


>Having been a HAM sice 1968, I hate to admit that I have  NEVER
worked 2
>meters.  I won a Radio Shack HTX 245  2meter / 70 cm HT.  Sharp
looking
>little HT.  Looks like it could be a lot of fun.  Anyone point
me to a good
>publication or primer on 2 meter operations?

>Thanks
>Mike

-----------------------------------------------------------

Got questions?  Get answers over the phone at Keen.com.
Up to 100 minutes free!
http://www.keen.com

 
 
 

And on another note.. 2 meters

Post by lak » Sun, 23 Jul 2000 04:00:00

Basically, the operations are mainly repeater based voice, with some simplex
Packet and voice.

The ARRL repeater guide and VHF Packet books are good sources of
information.

You will probably note depending how close to a metro area you live that 2
meters does at times sound like the 11 meter CB. Like the one answer you got
pointed out.

I mainly use my 2 meters to keep in contact with several friends and SKY
WARN weather activity due to the Tornados that pop around here.

kal


Quote:> Having been a HAM sice 1968, I hate to admit that I have  NEVER worked 2
> meters.  I won a Radio Shack HTX 245  2meter / 70 cm HT.  Sharp looking
> little HT.  Looks like it could be a lot of fun.  Anyone point me to a
good
> publication or primer on 2 meter operations?

> Thanks
> Mike

 
 
 

And on another note.. 2 meters

Post by Kenny A. Chaff » Sun, 23 Jul 2000 04:00:00



> 2 meter CB is like 11 meter CB, you have to listen to it for a
> while before you can pick up the lingo.

> Jeff
> KA1OGM


> >Having been a HAM sice 1968, I hate to admit that I have  NEVER
> worked 2
> >meters.  I won a Radio Shack HTX 245  2meter / 70 cm HT.  Sharp
> looking
> >little HT.  Looks like it could be a lot of fun.  Anyone point
> me to a good
> >publication or primer on 2 meter operations?

> >Thanks
> >Mike

> -----------------------------------------------------------

> Got questions?  Get answers over the phone at Keen.com.
> Up to 100 minutes free!
> http://www.keen.com

ROTFL!!! "2 meter CB," that's exactly what I'm thinking as I listen after
a few years away.

KAC
WB0E
--
KAC Website Design
Custom Programming, Web Design, and Graphics

 
 
 

And on another note.. 2 meters

Post by Barry » Sun, 23 Jul 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

> ROTFL!!! "2 meter CB," that's exactly what I'm thinking as I listen after
> a few years away.

What about the bozos on 20 Meters?  Makes some of the guys on CB sound like
angels.

Barry D.

 
 
 

And on another note.. 2 meters

Post by Mike Swa » Sun, 23 Jul 2000 04:00:00


> 2 meter CB is like 11 meter CB, you have to listen to it
> for a while before you can pick up the lingo.

2m reminds me of what 11m might sound like in Mayberry (say Hi to Aunt Bea
for me :-).  The operators that I've talked to in my area, metro Atlanta,
tend to be polite and work hard to run a clean station.  Along with the
locals, we have a number of short haul truck drivers that frequent the
repeaters.  They've helped me avoid bad traffic situations a number of times
by providing advance warning of the problem as well as alternate routes.

Even though the original poster mentioned that he'd been a ham since 1988,
there may also be new hams reading this.  Please forgive me for covering
things that are obvious to more experienced hams.

You'll probably want to pick up an ARRL Repeater Guide ($8) for determining
frequencies, offsets, and subaudible tones.  I keep one in the shack, one in
the mobile, and toss one in the suitcase with a handy talkie when traveling
out of town.

On 2m, you are required by the FCC to give your callsign once every 10
minutes and at the end of a conversation.  You are not required to give the
other stations callsign at the end of a conversation, but many 2m operators
do so anyway.

Instead of calling CQ, most 2m operators will say something like "kg4gge is
listening" or "kg4gge monitoring" to let other hams on the repeater know
they're interested in finding someone to talk to.

When calling a specific station, you generally give their callsign followed
by your own, as in "kg4frs, kg4gge" or "kg4frs, this is kg4gge calling".  If
the called station does not comes back within a few moments, the calling
stations clears the frequency by saying something along the lines of
"nothing heard, kg4gge clear".

When 3 or more stations get involved in a conversation, they will sometimes
use a "round table" format.  When the one station finishes transmitting,
they give the next station's callsign followed by their own to specify the n
ext station in the rotation, for example "pick it up kg4frs, this is
kg4gge - in the group".  Passing the baton like this helps prevent two
stations from "doubling" (talking at the same time).  A second or two of
dead air is generally left between each transmission so that new stations
can either join the conversation or request the use of the repeater for some
other purpose.

If you want to join an ongoing conversation or request use of the repeater,
you quickly say the last 3 letters of your callsign between the other
station's transmissions.  The operator who was about to pick up the
conversation will generally acknowledge you immediately and allow you in.
Emergency traffic is signified by saying "break break", all conversation
should cease at this point, with the other stations listening to see if they
can provide assistance.

You generally won't hear 10-codes on 2m, but some operators like to use a
few of the Q signals.  QSO, QSL, QSY, and QTH are the most prevalent.  Many
operators also use 73, the old railroad telegraph signature for "best
regards", when clearing out another station.

That's 2m FM repeater operation in a nutshell.  As several folks have
suggested, just listening to the activity is probably the best way to
determine the decorum used in your area.

73, Mike
kg4gge

 
 
 

And on another note.. 2 meters

Post by Mike Swa » Sun, 23 Jul 2000 04:00:00

"Even though the original poster mentioned that he'd been a

Quote:> ham since 1988..."

Oops, that's 1968.  My humble apologies for the typo.

73, Mike
kg4gge

 
 
 

And on another note.. 2 meters

Post by Dan » Sun, 23 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Quote:> 2 meter CB is like 11 meter CB, you have to listen to it for a
> while before you can pick up the lingo.

> Jeff
> KA1OGM

Maybe in your town Jeff.

Here in SLC operations are good, clean and fun. The only problem with 2
meters is that it's VERY crowded.  I've heard a lot worse on HF.

73 Dan
N7SLC

 
 
 

And on another note.. 2 meters

Post by Jyn » Sun, 23 Jul 2000 04:00:00

On Sat, 22 Jul 2000 02:15:53 -0500, Mike scribbled:

Quote:>Having been a HAM sice 1968, I hate to admit that I have
>NEVER worked 2 meters.  

I'm a little proud of you.  Wish I could say the same.
Tho' I now find I'm having a GOOD TIME doing 'difficult things' on
2M (and 6M) SSB ("weak signal".)  (Went there after getting sick
of the sludge I was encountering on 75M and 20M.)

I sort of gave up 2M FM about the ump***th time some ticket holder
asked me, "What repeater is this?" on .52

73,
Jonesy W3DHJ

--
Marvin L Jones         |  jonz             |  W3DHJ     |  OS/2

  7,703' -- 2,345m     |    frontier.net   |  DM68mn                SK

 
 
 

And on another note.. 2 meters

Post by C. Crew » Mon, 24 Jul 2000 04:00:00

Well said ...

Chuck Crews - KD4REL

********************************


> > 2 meter CB is like 11 meter CB, you have to listen to it
> > for a while before you can pick up the lingo.

> 2m reminds me of what 11m might sound like in Mayberry (say Hi to Aunt Bea
> for me :-).  The operators that I've talked to in my area, metro Atlanta,
> tend to be polite and work hard to run a clean station.  Along with the
> locals, we have a number of short haul truck drivers that frequent the
> repeaters.  They've helped me avoid bad traffic situations a number of
times
> by providing advance warning of the problem as well as alternate routes.

> Even though the original poster mentioned that he'd been a ham since 1988,
> there may also be new hams reading this.  Please forgive me for covering
> things that are obvious to more experienced hams.

> You'll probably want to pick up an ARRL Repeater Guide ($8) for
determining
> frequencies, offsets, and subaudible tones.  I keep one in the shack, one
in
> the mobile, and toss one in the suitcase with a handy talkie when
traveling
> out of town.

> On 2m, you are required by the FCC to give your callsign once every 10
> minutes and at the end of a conversation.  You are not required to give
the
> other stations callsign at the end of a conversation, but many 2m
operators
> do so anyway.

> Instead of calling CQ, most 2m operators will say something like "kg4gge
is
> listening" or "kg4gge monitoring" to let other hams on the repeater know
> they're interested in finding someone to talk to.

> When calling a specific station, you generally give their callsign
followed
> by your own, as in "kg4frs, kg4gge" or "kg4frs, this is kg4gge calling".
If
> the called station does not comes back within a few moments, the calling
> stations clears the frequency by saying something along the lines of
> "nothing heard, kg4gge clear".

> When 3 or more stations get involved in a conversation, they will
sometimes
> use a "round table" format.  When the one station finishes transmitting,
> they give the next station's callsign followed by their own to specify the
n
> ext station in the rotation, for example "pick it up kg4frs, this is
> kg4gge - in the group".  Passing the baton like this helps prevent two
> stations from "doubling" (talking at the same time).  A second or two of
> dead air is generally left between each transmission so that new stations
> can either join the conversation or request the use of the repeater for
some
> other purpose.

> If you want to join an ongoing conversation or request use of the
repeater,
> you quickly say the last 3 letters of your callsign between the other
> station's transmissions.  The operator who was about to pick up the
> conversation will generally acknowledge you immediately and allow you in.
> Emergency traffic is signified by saying "break break", all conversation
> should cease at this point, with the other stations listening to see if
they
> can provide assistance.

> You generally won't hear 10-codes on 2m, but some operators like to use a
> few of the Q signals.  QSO, QSL, QSY, and QTH are the most prevalent.
Many
> operators also use 73, the old railroad telegraph signature for "best
> regards", when clearing out another station.

> That's 2m FM repeater operation in a nutshell.  As several folks have
> suggested, just listening to the activity is probably the best way to
> determine the decorum used in your area.

> 73, Mike
> kg4gge

 
 
 

And on another note.. 2 meters

Post by Kenny A. Chaff » Mon, 24 Jul 2000 04:00:00



Quote:

> > ROTFL!!! "2 meter CB," that's exactly what I'm thinking as I listen after
> > a few years away.

> What about the bozos on 20 Meters?  Makes some of the guys on CB sound like
> angels.

> Barry D.

True, I'm sure. That's why I stick with CW.

KAC
--
KAC Website Design
Custom Programming, Web Design, and Graphics

 
 
 

And on another note.. 2 meters

Post by Louis Bybe » Mon, 24 Jul 2000 04:00:00

While your advice could apply to repeater operation, operating simplex
presents another story. One doesn't have to operate simplex very long
before hearing a "one sided" conversation. Depending on you location to
the answering station you may never hear it. I have heard stations
breaking in on a conversation because they couldn't hear the answering
party. Most people will wait for the "nothing heard", or "no contact"
before initiating a simplex contact themselves.

Louis



> >the called station does not comes back within a few moments, the calling
> >stations clears the frequency by saying something along the lines of
> >"nothing heard, kg4gge clear".

> Playing the Devil's Advocate:
> The "nothing heard" is redundant and unnecessary. Everyone else
> also "heard nothing," so why say it?

> Jeff KH6O

 
 
 

And on another note.. 2 meters

Post by Jeffrey Herm » Tue, 25 Jul 2000 04:00:00


>the called station does not comes back within a few moments, the calling
>stations clears the frequency by saying something along the lines of
>"nothing heard, kg4gge clear".

Playing the Devil's Advocate:
The "nothing heard" is redundant and unnecessary. Everyone else
also "heard nothing," so why say it?

Jeff KH6O

 
 
 

And on another note.. 2 meters

Post by M. Schneide » Tue, 25 Jul 2000 04:00:00



> >the called station does not comes back within a few moments, the calling
> >stations clears the frequency by saying something along the lines of
> >"nothing heard, kg4gge clear".

> Playing the Devil's Advocate:
> The "nothing heard" is redundant and unnecessary. Everyone else
> also "heard nothing," so why say it?

> Jeff KH6O

What if the person you are calling did answer you but isn't making into the
repeater for some reason, wrong or no tone, radio on low power, transmitter
dead, whatever.  I f he/she hears you say "nothing heard"  (I use "no
contact") then they know they aren't making it, for whatever reason.

Mark  K5MAR

 
 
 

And on another note.. 2 meters

Post by Jeffrey Herm » Tue, 25 Jul 2000 04:00:00



>> Playing the Devil's Advocate:
>> The "nothing heard" is redundant and unnecessary. Everyone else
>> also "heard nothing," so why say it?
>What if the person you are calling did answer you but isn't making into the
>repeater for some reason, wrong or no tone, radio on low power, transmitter
>dead, whatever.  I f he/she hears you say "nothing heard"  (I use "no
>contact") then they know they aren't making it, for whatever reason.

Wouldn't they get that same impression from hearing just "KH6O clear"?

Jeff KH6O