an HT from Hong Kong?

an HT from Hong Kong?

Post by Michael Fogar » Sun, 22 Oct 1995 04:00:00

Folks,

I'm new on the amateur radio scene and need some advice.  I'll be going
to Hong Kong soon and am interested in shopping for an HT.  What can you
advise me about:

* Brand
* available frequencies
* legalities
* costs

Even if you don't know anything about "export only" HT's or Hong Kong,
I'd appreciate your responses about Brands and costs.  I'm planning to
spend about $400-500 in HK on such a unit.

I've got friends who will guide me through the licensing process and
hook me up with the local Ham groups (Bay Area).  I intend to go legit
and certainly wouldn't want to break any laws by importing something
with extra frequencies ;-)

Imagine, though, that you could pick up anything available in the
$400-500 range.  What would you get?

Thanks,

Mike

 
 
 

an HT from Hong Kong?

Post by If you want my name just ask » Sun, 22 Oct 1995 04:00:00


Quote:>to Hong Kong soon and am interested in shopping for an HT.  What can
you
>advise me about:

I'd save myselft the trouble and buy from a stateside distributor, I've
heard of guys buying overseas HF gear with features or bands not avail.
in U.S but I've never heard of any great bargains. What you save by
shopping Hong Kong may cost you quickly if you have a problem or need
an accessory for the radio.

I have a Kenwood Dual band HT and like it alot.

73, Tim ka8ddz

 
 
 

an HT from Hong Kong?

Post by Erik Westgar » Mon, 23 Oct 1995 04:00:00

I was in Hong Kong this summer, staying in the Causeway Bay area.  I
was completely surprised by the number of authorized Icom dealers in
the city.  It seems like most if not all camera/electronics stores
sell Icom.  I saw some Kenwood, Standard, etc.  
Prices were never ever posted- there were coded tags on the items, and
the clerk would tell you, or show you a calculator with the amount.  In
my experience, prices were similar to here in the US, in most cases
higher in HK.  Some observations:
1. They had a lot of older stuff- dusty in fact.  95 percent was at
current "high rent district" list price.  One store, Wilson Camera,
8 Great George St, was giving decent prices on older gear that was
getting dusty.
2. Most if not a          ll of the gear was in the Asian/Japan
models- 440 gear ran on 430, and there is a great tendency for
the extended recieve we see on US 2M gear to be disabled.
3. Prices as I say were about US or more.
4. There will be a real warranty problem, unless you ship
it back to the dealer in HK
5. I believe the hma radio dealers in HK cater to tourists, such
as the Japanese, who have high prices at home, and would
benefit from the lower taxes, etc. in HK.
6. I am not sure what if any ham operating is done in HK- in China,
there may still be restriction on private stations.  In HK, I saw
a business (actually a Chinese dining room) running on Yeasu HTs
on 145.00 Mhz.
7. There were some odd and ends of other brands of gear, even at
the airport gift shop- brands I had not heard of.
8.
My big buy in 2 weeks a was an Icom BP24 I found in a pile of
older packs at Wilson.  I paid $67US for it, thinking it was
the last one on earth.  On the same trip, I bought a copy of CQ
magazine for $11.00 US and found Ross Distributing with the same packs,
price.

Would I go back- yes.  Buy some gear- maybe.  Fun place- I have never
been in more Ham Radio dealers in my life.

73,
Erik

 
 
 

an HT from Hong Kong?

Post by Bob Wit » Tue, 24 Oct 1995 04:00:00

: I was in Hong Kong this summer, staying in the Causeway Bay area.  I
: was completely surprised by the number of authorized Icom dealers in
: the city.  It seems like most if not all camera/electronics stores
: sell Icom.  I saw some Kenwood, Standard, etc.
   I've visited Hong Kong several times and purchased a radio or two
   on occasion. Let me compare/contrast my experiences.

: Prices were never ever posted- there were coded tags on the items, and
: the clerk would tell you, or show you a calculator with the amount.  In
: my experience, prices were similar to here in the US, in most cases
: higher in HK.  Some observations:
: 1. They had a lot of older stuff- dusty in fact.  95 percent was at
: current "high rent district" list price.  One store, Wilson Camera,
: 8 Great George St, was giving decent prices on older gear that was
: getting dusty.
   Yes. Amazing how old some of the stuff was. Actually worked to
   my advantage in one case since I wanted a model that was no
   longer available in the U.S.

: 2. Most if not a        ll of the gear was in the Asian/Japan
: models- 440 gear ran on 430, and there is a great tendency for
: the extended recieve we see on US 2M gear to be disabled.
   Major problem here. Watch out for versions of equipment that
   are setup for non-US markets. Its not always easy to figure
   out in advance, either.

: 3. Prices as I say were about US or more.
   I'd give them more credit than that...but its not always easy to
   tell the rockbottom price with extensive negotiation.

: 4. There will be a real warranty problem, unless you ship
: it back to the dealer in HK
: 5. I believe the hma radio dealers in HK cater to tourists, such
: as the Japanese, who have high prices at home, and would
: benefit from the lower taxes, etc. in HK.
   Actually, I am not sure WHO they really cater to. The prices
   I've seen in Tokyo are roughly equivalent to Hong Kong.
   Exchange rate would influence this, of course.

: Would I go back- yes.  Buy some gear- maybe.  Fun place- I have never
: been in more Ham Radio dealers in my life.

   Check.

: 73,
: Erik

    Bob KB0CY


 
 
 

an HT from Hong Kong?

Post by Dave East » Tue, 24 Oct 1995 04:00:00



Quote:

>I was in Hong Kong this summer, staying in the Causeway Bay area.  I
>was completely surprised by the number of authorized Icom dealers in

>Would I go back- yes.  Buy some gear- maybe.  Fun place- I have never
>been in more Ham Radio dealers in my life.

I would like to add to this thread - I was there not too long ago and I
got the feeling many stores were more "communications" stores. They had ham,
two way, commercial HF, you name it. Whatever you wanted, whoever you were,
they were happy to sell it to you. Perfectly legal, of course, as it would be
in the US, as long as you didn't try to use it here, or in HK. I suspect the
HK government keeps after toursts trying out their new toys before they leave!

I also found the HK shop keeper's to be the nastiest, most disinterested,
discourteous S.O.B.'s I have EVER run into. It was so bad I asked my hotel
manager what I was doing wrong. He said "probably nothing", adding "being
Caucasian and wanting less than 10 of anything was not a good combination for
many sales people; a serious problem in HK". All of this right after visiting
Tokyo where the HAM (REAL ham) stores where SO polite and friendly I literally
could not believe it.  

Dave,  WE6L/ Phoenix  

 
 
 

an HT from Hong Kong?

Post by David Crip » Tue, 24 Oct 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

>Folks,

>I'm new on the amateur radio scene and need some advice.  I'll be going
>to Hong Kong soon and am interested in shopping for an HT.  What can you
>advise me about:

One thing's for sure - you will have a fantastic choice of radios! I felt guiddy
every time I went shopping.

Every shop in Kowloon sells ham equipment, as well as walkmans, dodgy watches,
tee-shirts, sunglasses, you name it, they sell it.

The problem is that there is no such thing as a ham only store (well I didn't find one
in the four months I was there). So expert advice is difficult to get.

There are stories abound of people getting ripped off (especially in electrical shops),
if it's anything to go by I didn't buy anything while I was there - the fantastic cheap
bargins everybody hears about arn't there. The prices seem to be the same as
in the UK (eg the newish Sony SW-100 was about 240 sterling).

Save your self a LOT of hassle and buy local - and start up a friendship with the local
ham store owner - much better in the long term.

PS I use an ICOM IC2SA and an ICOM IC24SAT, both very reliable - long in the tooth but
do everything that the latest all singing HTs do.

My IC2SA has extended TX/RX and even works on marine (156 and up) and Airband RX down to
115MHz.

Good luck in HK, an evening meal in the art-deco cafe on the peak is not to be missed,
book a window table and enjoy the view (fond memories flooding back now).

Dave Cripps G7IDB

 
 
 

an HT from Hong Kong?

Post by Rafael Sol » Tue, 24 Oct 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

>>to Hong Kong soon and am interested in shopping for an HT.  What can
>you
>>advise me about:

>I'd save myselft the trouble and buy from a stateside distributor, I've
>heard of guys buying overseas HF gear with features or bands not avail.
>in U.S but I've never heard of any great bargains. What you save by
>shopping Hong Kong may cost you quickly if you have a problem or need
>an accessory for the radio.

>I have a Kenwood Dual band HT and like it alot.

>73, Tim ka8ddz

I agree with Tim.  I've been to HK several times on business trips and
it is not worth the hassling of dealing with the salesmen over there
(prices are not fixed and you have to deal, yes as in bargaining!).
Also there is the problem of the warranty.  I don't think any of the
major brands (K,I,Y) honor warranties of any equipment bought
overseas.  What I have bought though are accessories.  Bring your AES
catalog to check the price differences.  Some things are cheaper there
but others are around the same or even higher depending on the store.
Another suggestion is to get away from the Nathan Rd. stores, those
are usually overpriced.

Have fun in HK.

Rafael (KE6JSR)

 
 
 

an HT from Hong Kong?

Post by Kevin Karamano » Wed, 25 Oct 1995 04:00:00


Porray) writes:


>: >to Hong Kong soon and am interested in shopping for an HT.  What
can
>: you
>: >advise me about:

>: I'd save myselft the trouble and buy from a stateside distributor,

>Comments from a "Stateside distributor", who has had experience both
ways
>...

>If you buy a radio from someone you never saw before, and never expect
to
>see again, all he is going to be interested in is getting your money
out
>of your wallet and you on your way.

>If you buy from a local (or regional) dealer, you are buying from
someone
>who wants to see YOU happy, since he hopes that you will come back
again
>and again, for all those accessories, mobile radios, antennas and the
>like that we hams always need to add to our collection.

>If you bring in an oversees "Yaekenicostanco" radio, you will have NO
US
>warranty - the American distributors warrant only those radios that
they
>import, and quite possibly might not service them - they are
completely
>within their rights to do so. There very well may be (as has been in
the
>past) board or component differences between various versions of the
>radio destined for different countries, thus compounding the
situation.
>(Some manufacturers have had up to five different versions of the same
>radio - with each version destined for a different market area, with
>different regulations.)

>If you buy the radio from a local (or regional) dealer, you have
someone
>you can go to with questions and problems ... but long-distance calls
to
>Hong Kong to get answers to a question get expensive - to say nothing
of
>"how do you ask someone how to program odd splits for repeaters into
your
>new handy - when he is only really fluent, technically, in Chinese?"

>I doubt that you will find any significant price differentials in
buying
>in Hong Kong ... that was true years ago (I was there during the
VietNam
>era), but not now, with the global economy/distribution situation now
in
>existance. However, you can find real bargains in Hong Kong on things
>that are local-labor-intensive (like tailored suits for example).

>Enjoy your trip ... take the tram to the top of Victoria Peak and let
me
>know if the view is still as grand as it was on Christmas Day of 1972
..
>and good luck to you!

>Very 73,

>"Squeak" Porray, AD7K
>Manager, Amateur Electronic Supply/Las Vegas

>ps: I hope you don't think I am touting just our company ... in the
>above, I speak for the Amateur Radio community in general, and I think
>that it speaks for all domestic Amateur Radio Dealers as well.

I agree Squeek !!!  Very well said.  

73's

Kevin

 
 
 

an HT from Hong Kong?

Post by Jim We » Sun, 29 Oct 1995 04:00:00

By any chance the Bob Witte that was with Teledyne Ryan Space Systems
Microwave Lab in the late '60s early 70s?

Jim

Jim Weir VP Engineering  | "We seem to be standing on
RST Engineering          |  the foreskin of technology."
Grass Valley CA 95945    | (Gen Chuck Yeager)
voice/fax 916/272-1432   |

 
 
 

an HT from Hong Kong?

Post by Michael Fogar » Mon, 30 Oct 1995 03:00:00

: I'm new on the amateur radio scene and need some advice.  I'll be going
: to Hong Kong soon and am interested in shopping for an HT.  What can you
: advise me about:

Folks,

Thanks much for your input.  I leave for Hong Kong soon and don't expect
great deals.  I've secured an Amateur Electronic Supply catalog and will
shop cautiously.  I didn't even consider the warranty issue and I'm
much obliged to have had it brought to my attention.

I am surprised that nobody really seemed to mention the possibilities and
benefits of expanded frequencies.  Perhaps you're all old timers who've
gotten the modifiable radios (like my friends), or you don't really care
to listen in on the verboten bands.  Regardless, I'll have an HT on
returning from HK or I'll get one here soon thereafter (likely the latter).

I might have mentioned that I have been to HK once before, so I know
generally what to expect.  I'll have a few more sharp suits and memories
of the stunning views.

Thanks,
Mike
programmer, SRL

 
 
 

an HT from Hong Kong?

Post by Mike Au » Tue, 31 Oct 1995 04:00:00

Squeak,
 I aggre with you. Buy from a U.S. dealer, you may save 10%, but if you break
it, that 10% saving will vanish real quick. Kenwood won't even touch the radio,
you end up buying a service manual, hoping you can fix the problem, if it a
well know problem the manufacturer knows about, they won't even talk to you
about it.
 Its like buying a new car with no place to get it serviced, I don't think
thats a real bargin. Would you buy a car, appliance where you can get it
serviced.
 The prices of these hams rigs are getting up there in price, but to get a
small savings, later to need service, and not getting it is really stupid to
me.
 Again, would you buy a new car, appliance, knowing you can't get it
serviced here. A lot of new radio's even have bugs, but some manufacturers
are goods on fixing them with CPU upgrades, etc.
 I seen this with Kenwood, Yaesu, and Icom. Take you Hong Kong HT in an they
won't touch in in the U.S. most of the time.

Mike
W6TRW

 
 
 

an HT from Hong Kong?

Post by Jerry Gardn » Sat, 04 Nov 1995 04:00:00

: I am surprised that nobody really seemed to mention the possibilities and
: benefits of expanded frequencies.  Perhaps you're all old timers who've
: gotten the modifiable radios (like my friends), or you don't really care
: to listen in on the verboten bands.  Regardless, I'll have an HT on
: returning from HK or I'll get one here soon thereafter (likely the latter).

Expanded frequency coverage is a compromise. If I want such a compromise,
I'll buy a cheap Radio Shack scanner. I'd rather not made such a compromise
with my ham gear.

--
Jerry Gardner          | Maintainer of the Large Format Digest

 
 
 

an HT from Hong Kong?

Post by Chris Sma » Mon, 06 Nov 1995 04:00:00

 Jg> Expanded frequency coverage is a compromise. If I want such a
 Jg> compromise, I'll buy a cheap Radio Shack scanner. I'd rather not made
 Jg> such a compromise with my ham gear.

Exactly!  I have a Kenwood 241A.  Sure, it gets 118-174 MHZ, but about
65-70% of the repeaters I'm interested in on 2m get wiped out by intermod.
I plan on completely switching over to 440 mhz, as most of the locals in
my area have done.

.. 73, VE3 SHT.  19 years old, and licensed since June 15, 1987!
___ Blue Wave/QWK v2.12

PGP 2.6 public key available upon request!