TV cussing question

TV cussing question

Post by jiac.. » Sun, 13 Mar 1994 14:18:45

I have recently help to form a student run TV-staion that is broadcasting
over the air, WEXP-TV, Channel 28, Hoboken (across the river from Manhattan).
I wos wondering if anyone out there knows the rules as to what we can and
can not say over the air. I imagine it would be the same as with radio. I
need specifics. Any help would be appreciated. Also if there is anyone
out there in Manhattan, it would be greatly appreciated if you could
E-Mail me with information on how our picture looks. Thank you.

 
 
 

TV cussing question

Post by barry mishki » Tue, 15 Mar 1994 14:56:30



Quote:

>I have recently help to form a student run TV-staion that is broadcasting
>over the air, WEXP-TV, Channel 28, Hoboken (across the river from Manhattan).
>I wos wondering if anyone out there knows the rules as to what we can and
>can not say over the air. I imagine it would be the same as with radio.

What you fail to disclose is whether you are training the "students" to be
professionals or toilet mouthed idiots.

You will not find a single paying employer who will hire any tv talent on the
basis of how far he/she thinks they can take "free speech".

Just tell your students to grow up, act professional, and you don't need to worry a bit about what language you can use. It should be self evident.

--
============================================================================
Barry Mishkind

 
 
 

TV cussing question

Post by Mark Rober » Fri, 18 Mar 1994 20:15:22

[Moderator's Preface:  Please let's not start TV specific discussions
here in rrb.  As far as it applies to radio AND TV, fine, but I would
appreciate not having to kill the hthread as being off topic.  So far
it has been mariginal at best.  Thanks for your help.   Bill]


: >
: >I have recently help to form a student run TV-staion that is broadcasting
: >over the air, WEXP-TV, Channel 28, Hoboken (across the river from Manhattan).
: >I wos wondering if anyone out there knows the rules as to what we can and
: >can not say over the air. I imagine it would be the same as with radio.

: What you fail to disclose is whether you are training the "students" to be
: professionals or toilet mouthed idiots.

The following has almost nothing to do with radio, but it caused quite a
scandal in Columbia, Mo. at the time in 1979.

KOMU-TV (channel 8, NBC affiliate) has faculty staffing the station as
editors and anchors, but many of the reporters and weekend anchors are
students at the University of Missouri, which owns the station.

The local joke was to refer to the Saturday night newscast as "the opening
act for Saturday Night Live."  Blunders and bloopers abounded.
People watched just to see what would go wrong.

(Probably was a great way to fight cable:  Columbia had just gotten,
wonders of wonders, a *20-channel* system!)

Moreover, Channel 8 had yet to switch over entirely to tape; so there was a
reel of the newsfilm that was also involved.  Sometimes the reel would
break, throwing off all the timing.  For newsfilm stories, the voice-overs
were done on carts.  So, you can see, timing and precision were everything.

Saturday nights were so bad, we used to take bets on who would***up the
most--engineering, production, or news.  Winnings were fairly evenly
distributed.

Anyway, the student anchor one Saturday night just had one hell of a night.
The wrong audio kept getting punched up, scripts were out of order, you
name it, and it went wrong.

There was also a reporter in-studio that night for some breaking story.
The camera switched to the reporter.  The student anchor's mike was still
on.

Not realizing that, he said, "What the *** is going on?"

It made the papers the next day.  The student anchor was red-faced, to say
the least.  Moreover, such a comment was extremely out of character for
him.  (He was a friend of mine and you couldn't ask for anyone better.  It
hurt to see this happen to him.)

Fortunately, this story has a happy ending.  He was suspended for a couple
of weeks, then went back on, graudated, and, last I heard, is news director
for a TV station in Alabama or Mississippi.

: Just tell your students to grow up, act professional, and you don't need to worry a bit about what language you can use. It should be self evident.

Time for a Transvoxian comment:  it seems radio has preceded TV by about
ten years or so when it comes to the dumbing-down of programming.  No doubt
it won't be long before radio morning-show type antics get translated
somehow onto the TV airwaves.  Maybe these guys are preparing for the
future?  One would hope not, but entropy *is* everywhere.
--
==============================================================================


Kansas City, Missouri | These accounts are personally funded.
Any uncredited opinions in this Usenet post are page faults of my imagination.
==============================================================================

 
 
 

TV cussing question

Post by prmo.. » Sat, 19 Mar 1994 14:11:49

Mark's posting mentioned how timing, etc would be screwed up
at the Columbia MO TV station.

Things aren't necessarily better in bigger markets.

With New York, the #1 TV Market (right?), you still see things as
described below, especially on the 11 o'clock news, especially
on weekends:

-The newsreader starts with a story and the wrong film appears
on the screen.

-During sports they show the highlights, but the sportscaster isn't
exactly sure which clips he'll get and the description is
choppy.

or

the wrong highlights come up first

or

Sometimes the news anchor has to do the sports and sounds
like they have never had to describe sports action at any time in
there work history ("and the Mets scored 3 points in the top of
the ninth to win it at Shea...")(can you find 2 things wrong with
that statement?, maybe three since it involves the words Mets and Win)

or

the sportscaster goes to talk about the next story and nothing else comes on,
leaving him to say "Are we going to get St. John's or not? No?
Maybe later."

I would expect things to be run a lot more smoothly in New York
than they are.  I wouldn't be surprised if Sal Marciano on
WNBC-4, for example (because I wrote him a sympathetic letter
praising his not losing his cool on the air when a most incompetent
staff screwed up his weekend sports), said the same thing
off mic that the person in Columbia MO accidentally said on mic.

One other stupid thing while part of the topic is TV sports.

On an audio reel to reel machine, the two reels both rotate in
a counter clockwise direction. Isn't it the same for video , that
the reels travel in identical directions?

So why is it on the George Michael sports machine do the reels
rotate towards each other?  My guess is they are just props,
and they figured the general public wouldn't notice. After all,
he has another prop with all these buttons but he always hits
the same one and the same reels start turning in the background.
i.e. the Machine isn't what really is playing back the tapes.

I think George Michael considers every market he is on to be
equally populated.   That's why New Yorkers see more auto racing
and rodeo on GMSM than any other sportscast.
Let's see we're on in 200 markets, 100 of them have rodeos nearby,
so we'll run highlights, so what if the population of the markets
I'm on in is 1/20 the total population of those 200 markets...

I'd better stop before I think of more...

[Moderator's Note:  I get a lot of heat for approving these
off-charter posts [about TV].  I do it because theya re generally good
articles.  But I will have to call a halt to this thread, since they
are off-charter and since it makes it hard to tell other off-charter
posters to stay on topic.  I hope you understand.  Bill]

 
 
 

TV cussing question

Post by jw » Wed, 23 Mar 1994 22:12:04

   Time for a Transvoxian comment:  it seems radio has preceded TV by about
   ten years or so when it comes to the dumbing-down of programming.  No doubt
   it won't be long before radio morning-show type antics get translated
   somehow onto the TV airwaves.  Maybe these guys are preparing for the
   future?  One would hope not, but entropy *is* everywhere.

The morning show at WZZQ-FM/Terre Haute, our local rock station, is a
typical music-plus-silliness thing starring Scott Dean and Debbie Hunter.
Welp, two years ago, they went and got themselves a late-night TV gig as
well.  Friday nights after Conan on the NBC affiliate here, you can watch
_Nightmare_Alley_, which is a bad-movie-plus-silliness thing.  So, instead
of music, it's segments of the bad-movie-of-the-week.  

Gets better ratings than Letterman.

jim

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