freq chart standard freq and time signal

freq chart standard freq and time signal

Post by mik » Tue, 20 Aug 2002 07:10:09

On the freq chart and standard freq and time signal at 10mhz I noted
that to 9.995 to 10.003 its going all the way up the USB AM LSB band
of the freq and on the 10.003 to 10.005 mhz it stop in the mid range
on the chart is the for testing of the lower side band of a radio
reciving and the other all three bands am, usb and lsb? if so then I
should be able to test my reciver on the LSB if its the lower mid
range one on the chart at 10.003 t0 10.005 mhz standard test signal
and should hear only at LSB ? and on all bands AM USM LSB at 9.995 to
10.003? is this true? Iam not sure just as am a newbe to reciving SW
 
 
 

freq chart standard freq and time signal

Post by J999 » Tue, 20 Aug 2002 10:14:03


Quote:>On the freq chart and standard freq and time signal at 10mhz I noted
>that to 9.995 to 10.003 its going all the way up the USB AM LSB band
>of the freq and on the 10.003 to 10.005 mhz it stop in the mid range
>on the chart is the for testing of the lower side band of a radio
>reciving and the other all three bands am, usb and lsb?

Uhhhh .... huh ?

Can you re-write that and throw a few more comma's in there?

:^]

jw
WB9UAI

 
 
 

freq chart standard freq and time signal

Post by phil :\ » Tue, 20 Aug 2002 10:36:38

hi Mike:

i would respond but i am unsure what you are asking.

phil :)

 
 
 

freq chart standard freq and time signal

Post by mik » Wed, 21 Aug 2002 07:07:40

I redone this post hope it help with what Iam trying to say sorry .
 On the a freq chart I seen standard freq and time signal at 10mhz, I
noted
 that to 9.995 to 10.003 its going all the way up the freq I gress its
lsb, am and usb for the complete freq.
  the freq on the chart shows the 10.003 to 10.005 mhz and it stop in
at mid range is that the LSB of the AM?.
 the freq is it for testing of the of a radio
 reciving ? Hope this help thing seem a little easy to understand as I
get a little mixed up when I try to tell something in typed words
sorry.
 
 
 

freq chart standard freq and time signal

Post by CW » Wed, 21 Aug 2002 12:57:35

Well, I've read this four times and still don't understand it. I guess I
need to brush up on my code reading. :)
--

CW
KC7NOD
Web Page:  www.kc7nod.20m.com


Quote:> On the freq chart and standard freq and time signal at 10mhz I noted
> that to 9.995 to 10.003 its going all the way up the USB AM LSB band
> of the freq and on the 10.003 to 10.005 mhz it stop in the mid range
> on the chart is the for testing of the lower side band of a radio
> reciving and the other all three bands am, usb and lsb? if so then I
> should be able to test my reciver on the LSB if its the lower mid
> range one on the chart at 10.003 t0 10.005 mhz standard test signal
> and should hear only at LSB ? and on all bands AM USM LSB at 9.995 to
> 10.003? is this true? Iam not sure just as am a newbe to reciving SW

 
 
 

freq chart standard freq and time signal

Post by phil :\ » Wed, 21 Aug 2002 12:53:39

hi CW:

do you know of special features that prevent LSB usage on old military
communications equipment... maybe to prevent accidental usage? this seems to
be some of what Mike is asking.

Mike:

if you want to test LSB go to 80 meter (3500 to 4000 kHz) ham band!

phil :)

 
 
 

freq chart standard freq and time signal

Post by J999 » Wed, 21 Aug 2002 14:21:30

To test the LSB, try tuning in some hams either between 7.200 - 7.300mhz, or
between 3.8 and 4.0 mhz at night. They only use LSB. [and a few AMer's once and
a while].

jw
WB9UAI

 
 
 

freq chart standard freq and time signal

Post by CW » Wed, 21 Aug 2002 14:32:41

It's very likely that if he opens the case he will find that the LSB section
of the switch is not even connected. I don't know how old this thing is but
it is not unusual, specially during war time, for the military to be
supplied with off the shelf civilian equipment modified to suit them. Also,
it is common for a field modification notice to be put out on a piece of
equipment (I know there is a military term for this but it's been to long to
remember). It is possible the thing was originally issued with LSB
capability and later modified to "goof proof" it as much as possible. Could
be it was supposed to work in which case there is some troubleshooting to be
done. Chances are though, that it was either never functional or field
modified. If it was shipped to the army as a modification of a civilian
radio it may be LSB capable but just not wired. If it was a field
modification, chances are that the wires to the switch were cut, rolled up
and taped. Reconnecting them would be all that was necessary.
--

CW
KC7NOD
Web Page:  www.kc7nod.20m.com


Quote:> hi CW:

> do you know of special features that prevent LSB usage on old military
> communications equipment... maybe to prevent accidental usage? this seems
to
> be some of what Mike is asking.

> Mike:

> if you want to test LSB go to 80 meter (3500 to 4000 kHz) ham band!

> phil :)

 
 
 

freq chart standard freq and time signal

Post by phil :\ » Wed, 21 Aug 2002 14:55:05

thanks for the explaination CW. if he cannot get LSB going he may need to
open it up.

phil :)

 
 
 

freq chart standard freq and time signal

Post by JJ » Thu, 22 Aug 2002 13:11:37


> It's very likely that if he opens the case he will find that the LSB section
> of the switch is not even connected. I don't know how old this thing is but
> it is not unusual, specially during war time, for the military to be
> supplied with off the shelf civilian equipment modified to suit them. Also,
> it is common for a field modification notice to be put out on a piece of
> equipment (I know there is a military term for this but it's been to long to
> remember). It is possible the thing was originally issued with LSB
> capability and later modified to "goof proof" it as much as possible. Could
> be it was supposed to work in which case there is some troubleshooting to be
> done. Chances are though, that it was either never functional or field
> modified. If it was shipped to the army as a modification of a civilian
> radio it may be LSB capable but just not wired. If it was a field
> modification, chances are that the wires to the switch were cut, rolled up
> and taped. Reconnecting them would be all that was necessary.
> --

I hear operators on 40 meters using military gear on USB. They get
flack from other ops on the band but they say the gear is not
capable of LSB.