New DRM receiver available

New DRM receiver available

Post by byrne » Sat, 06 Nov 2004 17:49:19

I would hope that it covers more than the standard MW range - I'm
still waiting for a reply.  Haven't seen any reviews at all for it yet
- I'd be interested in finding out its performance!

There's a slightly different version of their specs sheet on their
website (little difference apart from it being marked as v2.0):
http://www.codingtechnologies.com/products/assets/digitalworldtravell...

..Francis

 
 
 

New DRM receiver available

Post by RH » Sun, 07 Nov 2004 08:41:44




Quote:> I would hope that it covers more than the standard MW range - I'm
> still waiting for a reply.  Haven't seen any reviews at all for it yet
> - I'd be interested in finding out its performance!

> There's a slightly different version of their specs sheet on their
> website (little difference apart from it being marked as v2.0):
> http://www.codingtechnologies.com/products/assets/digitalworldtravell...

> ..Francis

FRANCIS,

So this would appear to be a DRM 'mini' Receiver Module that is
'Powered' via the USB Port of a LapTop or DeskTop PC with the
Signal and Audio "Processing" done by the Computer.  
[ A Computer 'plug-in' Accessory ]
http://www.codingtechnologies.com/products/digtrav.htm

"Reception of Digital Radio Mondiale, analogue AM and FM"  
Appears to covers the standard 'analog' AM & FM Bands with
10 Station Pre-Sets per Band.  

Mentions "DRM" 'coverage' below 30 MHz:  
So may be the Shortwave Bands are covered by DRM 'only'.  

Mentions both a Wire and Loop Antenna Inputs that are controled
by the Computer.

TBL:  It is NOT a Stand-Alone DRM Radio.

However it is an interesting design concept and at 199 Euros
may be 'right' priced.

waiting and wondering ~ RHF
.
.

 
 
 

New DRM receiver available

Post by Prometheu » Sun, 07 Nov 2004 08:56:36





>> I would hope that it covers more than the standard MW range - I'm
>> still waiting for a reply.  Haven't seen any reviews at all for it yet
>> - I'd be interested in finding out its performance!

>> There's a slightly different version of their specs sheet on their
>> website (little difference apart from it being marked as v2.0):

>>http://www.codingtechnologies.com/products/assets/digitalworldtraveller
>>_v2.pdf

>> ..Francis

>FRANCIS,

>So this would appear to be a DRM 'mini' Receiver Module that is
>'Powered' via the USB Port of a LapTop or DeskTop PC with the
>Signal and Audio "Processing" done by the Computer.
>[ A Computer 'plug-in' Accessory ]
>http://www.codingtechnologies.com/products/digtrav.htm

>"Reception of Digital Radio Mondiale, analogue AM and FM"
>Appears to covers the standard 'analog' AM & FM Bands with
>10 Station Pre-Sets per Band.

>Mentions "DRM" 'coverage' below 30 MHz:
>So may be the Shortwave Bands are covered by DRM 'only'.

It says of DRM "new standard for digital broadcasting below 30 MHz", it
does not state that it provides shortwave reception in any mode.

--
Ian             G8ILZ

 
 
 

New DRM receiver available

Post by RH » Sun, 07 Nov 2004 20:57:39







> >> I would hope that it covers more than the standard MW range - I'm
> >> still waiting for a reply.  Haven't seen any reviews at all for it yet
> >> - I'd be interested in finding out its performance!

> >> There's a slightly different version of their specs sheet on their
> >> website (little difference apart from it being marked as v2.0):

> >>http://www.codingtechnologies.com/products/assets/digitalworldtraveller
> >>_v2.pdf

> >> ..Francis

> >FRANCIS,

> >So this would appear to be a DRM 'mini' Receiver Module that is
> >'Powered' via the USB Port of a LapTop or DeskTop PC with the
> >Signal and Audio "Processing" done by the Computer.
> >[ A Computer 'plug-in' Accessory ]
> >http://www.codingtechnologies.com/products/digtrav.htm

> >"Reception of Digital Radio Mondiale, analogue AM and FM"
> >Appears to covers the standard 'analog' AM & FM Bands with
> >10 Station Pre-Sets per Band.

> >Mentions "DRM" 'coverage' below 30 MHz:
> >So may be the Shortwave Bands are covered by DRM 'only'.

> It says of DRM "new standard for digital broadcasting below 30 MHz", it
> does not state that it provides shortwave reception in any mode.

"P" - "So may be" - one wonders ~ RHF
.
 
 
 

New DRM receiver available

Post by byrne » Fri, 12 Nov 2004 00:53:16

Hi,

I finally got a reply from Coding Technologies just a few mintues ago:

"the freq ranges are 88-108 MHz FM and 150-29999 kHz AM/DRM"

Sounds good to me! :)

Regards,
..Francis

Quote:> > >> I would hope that it covers more than the standard MW range - I'm
> > >> still waiting for a reply.  Haven't seen any reviews at all for it yet
> > >> - I'd be interested in finding out its performance!

> > >> There's a slightly different version of their specs sheet on their
> > >> website (little difference apart from it being marked as v2.0):

> > >>http://www.codingtechnologies.com/products/assets/digitalworldtraveller
> > >>_v2.pdf

> > >> ..Francis

> > >FRANCIS,

> > >So this would appear to be a DRM 'mini' Receiver Module that is
> > >'Powered' via the USB Port of a LapTop or DeskTop PC with the
> > >Signal and Audio "Processing" done by the Computer.
> > >[ A Computer 'plug-in' Accessory ]
> > >http://www.codingtechnologies.com/products/digtrav.htm

> > >"Reception of Digital Radio Mondiale, analogue AM and FM"
> > >Appears to covers the standard 'analog' AM & FM Bands with
> > >10 Station Pre-Sets per Band.

> > >Mentions "DRM" 'coverage' below 30 MHz:
> > >So may be the Shortwave Bands are covered by DRM 'only'.

> > It says of DRM "new standard for digital broadcasting below 30 MHz", it
> > does not state that it provides shortwave reception in any mode.

> "P" - "So may be" - one wonders ~ RHF
> .

 
 
 

New DRM receiver available

Post by Stev » Fri, 12 Nov 2004 08:52:14


> Hi,

> I finally got a reply from Coding Technologies just a few mintues ago:

> "the freq ranges are 88-108 MHz FM and 150-29999 kHz AM/DRM"

> Sounds good to me! :)

> Regards,
> ..Francis

> > > >> I would hope that it covers more than the standard MW range - I'm
> > > >> still waiting for a reply.  Haven't seen any reviews at all for it yet
> > > >> - I'd be interested in finding out its performance!

> > > >> There's a slightly different version of their specs sheet on their
> > > >> website (little difference apart from it being marked as v2.0):

> > > >>http://www.codingtechnologies.com/products/assets/digitalworldtraveller
> > > >>_v2.pdf

> > > >> ..Francis

> > > >FRANCIS,

> > > >So this would appear to be a DRM 'mini' Receiver Module that is
> > > >'Powered' via the USB Port of a LapTop or DeskTop PC with the
> > > >Signal and Audio "Processing" done by the Computer.
> > > >[ A Computer 'plug-in' Accessory ]
> > > >http://www.codingtechnologies.com/products/digtrav.htm

> > > >"Reception of Digital Radio Mondiale, analogue AM and FM"
> > > >Appears to covers the standard 'analog' AM & FM Bands with
> > > >10 Station Pre-Sets per Band.

> > > >Mentions "DRM" 'coverage' below 30 MHz:
> > > >So may be the Shortwave Bands are covered by DRM 'only'.

> > > It says of DRM "new standard for digital broadcasting below 30 MHz", it
> > > does not state that it provides shortwave reception in any mode.

> > "P" - "So may be" - one wonders ~ RHF
> > .

I don't know that much about DRM, but my understanding is that
stations either come in very clearly or not at all. In other words, if
there's a really distant station, you can't dig it out of the mud and
just have to write it off. Is that correct? If so, I don't think I'd
want a DRM receiver. But again, I could be wrong about this.

Steve

 
 
 

New DRM receiver available

Post by RH » Sat, 13 Nov 2004 04:47:28




> > Hi,

> > I finally got a reply from Coding Technologies just a few mintues ago:

> > "the freq ranges are 88-108 MHz FM and 150-29999 kHz AM/DRM"

> > Sounds good to me! :)

> > Regards,
> > ..Francis

> > > > >> I would hope that it covers more than the standard MW range - I'm
> > > > >> still waiting for a reply.  Haven't seen any reviews at all for it yet
> > > > >> - I'd be interested in finding out its performance!

> > > > >> There's a slightly different version of their specs sheet on their
> > > > >> website (little difference apart from it being marked as v2.0):

> > > > >>http://www.codingtechnologies.com/products/assets/digitalworldtraveller
> > > > >>_v2.pdf

> > > > >> ..Francis

> > > > >FRANCIS,

> > > > >So this would appear to be a DRM 'mini' Receiver Module that is
> > > > >'Powered' via the USB Port of a LapTop or DeskTop PC with the
> > > > >Signal and Audio "Processing" done by the Computer.
> > > > >[ A Computer 'plug-in' Accessory ]
> > > > >http://www.codingtechnologies.com/products/digtrav.htm

> > > > >"Reception of Digital Radio Mondiale, analogue AM and FM"
> > > > >Appears to covers the standard 'analog' AM & FM Bands with
> > > > >10 Station Pre-Sets per Band.

> > > > >Mentions "DRM" 'coverage' below 30 MHz:
> > > > >So may be the Shortwave Bands are covered by DRM 'only'.

> > > > It says of DRM "new standard for digital broadcasting below 30 MHz", it
> > > > does not state that it provides shortwave reception in any mode.

> > > "P" - "So may be" - one wonders ~ RHF
> > > .

> I don't know that much about DRM, but my understanding is that
> stations either come in very clearly or not at all. In other words, if
> there's a really distant station, you can't dig it out of the mud and
> just have to write it off. Is that correct? If so, I don't think I'd
> want a DRM receiver. But again, I could be wrong about this.

> Steve

SD,

Good 'old fashion' (Tried-and-True) "Analog" AM International
Broadcasting {Long Distance} may have it's FADE and Weak Signals.
-  Remember Analog Celphones ?

DRM "Digital" AM Broadcasting AM International Broadcasting
{Long Distance} has it's Signal Drop-Off.  
- Its Here (Can be Heard) "Great Sound" and then Its Gone [.]
-  Think of Digital Celphones !

DRM may be good and useful for In-Country 1000 Mile Broadcasting;
but for "Around-the-World" International Broadcasting it offers no
real advantage in Punching the Signal Through and Getting Heard.

NOTE:  Single Side Band (SSB) Transmissions do a better
'energy efficent' job and has a real advantage in Punching
the Signal Through and Getting Heard.

The Most Cost-Effective-Method and the Trend for Governments and
'others' who want to get their Message-Out to the Masses of other
Countries will continue to be Internet Broadcasting "On-Demand"
Streaming Audio that is THERE when the Listener Whats to Hear It;
and Host Country Re-Broadcasting via 'local' AM and FM Band Radios;
or via "In-Country" Shortwave Relays.

ssi ~ RHF
.
.