Front End

Front End

Post by Jeffrey Donohu » Tue, 25 Feb 1997 04:00:00

Can someone explain to me what "overloading the Front End" means?
I see this referred to many times here.
What does it sound like? Can the receiver be damaged?
--
Jeffrey Donohue

 
 
 

Front End

Post by David14 » Tue, 25 Feb 1997 04:00:00


Overloading the front end means that too much RF signal (radio frequency
signal) is reaching your receiver through the antenna.  The front end is
the first part of the receiver the signal goes after coming down the
antenna.  On my receivers, it is a lot of noise, so much noise that there
is no intelligible audio at all, but I have read that it can be pure
silence.  To me, this only happens when I kick in an RF booster in a
situation when it is not needed.  As long as it does not happen to often,
or for extended periods of time, I don't think it will do any harm, but
this may depend on your receiver.  

 
 
 

Front End

Post by T. J. » Tue, 25 Feb 1997 04:00:00


> Can someone explain to me what "overloading the Front End" means?
> I see this referred to many times here.
> What does it sound like? Can the receiver be damaged?
> --
> Jeffrey Donohue


This is when a strong signal essentially swamps the receiver producing an
unreadable signal if anything at all. In theory a really really strong
signal could damage a receivers front end but I expect you would have to
be standing with the receiver pressed up against the antenna. For
example, I drive my car daily within 100 feet of a 50 kw clear channel AM
station. My receiver works fine.
--
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Front End

Post by David Rickme » Wed, 26 Feb 1997 04:00:00

On 24 Feb 1997 03:07:16 GMT, "Jeffrey Donohue"


>Can someone explain to me what "overloading the Front End" means?
>I see this referred to many times here.
>What does it sound like? Can the receiver be damaged?

The front end is what the antenna connects to inside the radio.  Some
radios have better front ends than others.  Overloading can
desensitize the radio (a strong station other than the one you are
trying to hear causes the AGC to reduce RF gain);  or can cause
intermodulation products (stations appear on the wrong frequencies,
"monkey chatter" or morse code appears in the background when
listening to broadcast stations).  It won't hurt your radio.  A cheap
"High Q" preselector will often help immensely.
dr