Why not SW-100 clones?

Why not SW-100 clones?

Post by snow » Sun, 09 Sep 2001 19:54:09

Anyone know why Grundig, Sangean, Radio Shack or other companies don't come
up with their own version of the Sony SW-100 marvel? I would think there
would be some sales there, especially if it was sold at a lower price. The
SW-100 is really the only could choice for that small a model.
 
 
 

Why not SW-100 clones?

Post by Diverd47 » Sun, 09 Sep 2001 22:13:29


Grundig looks like it's coming out with one..
 
 
 

Why not SW-100 clones?

Post by Diverd47 » Sun, 09 Sep 2001 22:56:19

Looks like a sw-100 clone  (May lack SSB)

http://www.universal-radio.com/catalog/portable/0077.html

 
 
 

Why not SW-100 clones?

Post by snow » Mon, 10 Sep 2001 00:15:19

I viewed the Grundig clone from your link. It looks promising though Grundig
may have made some compromises....it may lack a swivel antenna....that's
important for SW radio listening. It lacks a synch control. And SSB. Maybe
Grundig could put out a second version adding these things and price it
around $200 or so. Just a thought.

Quote:> Looks like a sw-100 clone  (May lack SSB)

> http://www.universal-radio.com/catalog/portable/0077.html

 
 
 

Why not SW-100 clones?

Post by John A. Figliozz » Mon, 10 Sep 2001 12:58:11

Looks to me like this is a slightly upscale version of the Executive Traveller
G4, which sells for the ridiculously high price of $99!  If so, the tuning is
analog although the display is digital.  And that display may only read out in
10 kHz. steps.  I think a second hand SW-100 could be had for just a few
dollars above the $159 list price for this "new" Grundig receiver.

Although Grundig (actually Lextronix) deserves praise for trying to bring
shortwave radios into the mainstream market, they have unfortunately of late
brought to market as many overpriced dogs (Traveller, Traveller II, G-2000
"Porsche") as they have decent receivers (305, 400, 800).  I say unfortunately
because if a newcomer to shortwave purchases one of the dogs, he or she is
maore likely to be frustrated by shortwave rather than enchanted by it.

John Figliozzi


> I viewed the Grundig clone from your link. It looks promising though Grundig
> may have made some compromises....it may lack a swivel antenna....that's
> important for SW radio listening. It lacks a synch control. And SSB. Maybe
> Grundig could put out a second version adding these things and price it
> around $200 or so. Just a thought.


> > Looks like a sw-100 clone  (May lack SSB)

> > http://www.universal-radio.com/catalog/portable/0077.html

 
 
 

Why not SW-100 clones?

Post by Diverd47 » Mon, 10 Sep 2001 21:13:07

John, you may be right  about it being one step up from the G4; -
Skipping the price ( Very high for what you get ( untested )
Edited specs below..
[
" dual conversion superheterodyne circuitry, "

" Shortwave coverage is 2-10.4 and 11-30 MHz
- liquid crystal display (LCD) shows you everything.
 Manual tuning .. fast or automatic scanning
store  30  in memories (10 AM, 10 FM, 10 SW) for instant recall. ]
$159

- So this looks like a step up from the G4 ( Specs listed below)

[The G4 Executive Traveller  Frequency coverage of this digital portable
includes AM, FM and six shortwave bands: 5.85-6.4, 7-7.6, 9.38-10.05,
11.55-12.3, 14.97-15.85 and 17.3-18.35 MHz. A digital quartz clock wakes you to
the radio.
]
$99

I don't know how the New Grundig  works , especially with a short external
antenna or AN-LP-1 since, as far as I know,  noones reviewed it

For the money, and small size a Sangean 606A is a real bargain. I own one, &
take it evrywhere I travel . I was up in the finger lakes this spring
(Skaneatles) and, using the whip,  could pick up WBCQ when they were
broadcasting at 100 watts after the truck hit the power pole. Staticy, but you
colud hear Alan Wiener describing what was going on..
(Specs below )
[
The Sangean ATS-606AP covers 153 - 29995 kHz (all longwave, AM and shortwave
frequencies!) plus FM stereo (stereo to headphone jack).  digital readout, 1
kHz shortwave tuning, 54 memories and keypad entry. With Auto Tune Scan all
memories are preset in order of station signal strength on FM/AM/LW. A dual
digital clock-timer alarm can show local and UTC. With dial light and lock
switch. Requires three AA cells.

The Sangean ATS-606AP includes: case, earbuds and multilingual Owner's Manual
plus the ANT-60 wind-up antenna and multi-voltage AC adapter. Only
5.75x3.5x1.25 inches 16 oz (146x90x32 mm 450 g).
]
$99

 - Unless you like the styling of the " New " Grundig,  in which case all bets
are off. It'll look good spotlighted  in the glass radio showcase at an airport
or Travel Store.

Dan

 
 
 

Why not SW-100 clones?

Post by Nobody You Kn » Tue, 11 Sep 2001 02:24:48


>Looks like a sw-100 clone  (May lack SSB)

>http://www.universal-radio.com/catalog/portable/0077.html

Universal's price is only $130. This thing looks like another Grundig toy to
fool those travelling executives into thinking they just bought the world's
best radio (after all, it's a Grundig and it looks so cool).

I wish Grundig would show some pride and start making very good radios in
Germany, like they used to.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
If voting could really change things, it would be illegal.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
 

Why not SW-100 clones?

Post by snow » Tue, 11 Sep 2001 07:06:47

I agree...Grundig has made good radios like the YB 400, but seem to fall
short in making a decent radio similiar to the Sony SW-100 size.



> >Looks like a sw-100 clone  (May lack SSB)

> >http://www.universal-radio.com/catalog/portable/0077.html

> Universal's price is only $130. This thing looks like another Grundig toy
to
> fool those travelling executives into thinking they just bought the
world's
> best radio (after all, it's a Grundig and it looks so cool).

> I wish Grundig would show some pride and start making very good radios in
> Germany, like they used to.

> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
---
> If voting could really change things, it would be illegal.
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------

---
 
 
 

Why not SW-100 clones?

Post by Daniel S » Tue, 11 Sep 2001 10:01:14


Quote:> Looks to me like this is a slightly upscale version of the Executive Traveller
> G4, which sells for the ridiculously high price of $99!  If so, the tuning is
> analog although the display is digital.  And that display may only read out in
> 10 kHz. steps.  I think a second hand SW-100 could be had for just a few
> dollars above the $159 list price for this "new" Grundig receiver.

> Although Grundig (actually Lextronix) deserves praise for trying to bring
> shortwave radios into the mainstream market, they have unfortunately of late
> brought to market as many overpriced dogs (Traveller, Traveller II, G-2000
> "Porsche") as they have decent receivers (305, 400, 800).  I say unfortunately
> because if a newcomer to shortwave purchases one of the dogs, he or she is
> maore likely to be frustrated by shortwave rather than enchanted by it.
> John Figliozzi

        The Grundig Executive is the Tecsun 818 and sold in the nether
        regions of China for about RMB 138 CNY (about 8 to the the U.S. dollar)
        so about 17 US Dollars.
        They are cheaper in the provinces than the big cities, and this year
        I found horizontal design models from ECB model RS-9702,
        and 'cheaper' knockoffs of the 818 as the Kchibo KK-868 model.
        In Beijing, the Hong Qiao market, renowned for pearls, fish and
        piracy in ChongWen district has stalls selling a variety, but
        most of the more common department stores may have a selection,
        though Tecsun seems to be creating a store brand monopoly with a
        few Sony models thrown in to make everything else seem inexpensive
        by comparison.
        Visit the Tecsun website for more model, in GB2312 Chinese and English
        www.tecsun.com.cn/     or www.tecsun.com.cn/english
        (The Chinese pages are more complex with store locations, news of radio
        and about China, hams, prizes, etc.)  Google.com advance finds about 15
        external links, mostly Chinese hams, to their pages.
        You'll recognize many models as only the face plate changes.
|-\_,-~-\___...__._._._._._._._._._._._.
For real Dxing, see http://www.asahi-net.or.jp/~vz6g-iwt/index.html
 
 
 

Why not SW-100 clones?

Post by Chris Malco » Thu, 13 Sep 2001 11:05:19


>Anyone know why Grundig, Sangean, Radio Shack or other companies don't come
>up with their own version of the Sony SW-100 marvel? I would think there
>would be some sales there, especially if it was sold at a lower price. The
>SW-100 is really the only could choice for that small a model.

Putting all that technology into a receiver so small was one of the
last special projects initiated by Sony's founder. It is exactly the
size of an old-style cassette case, continuing the tradition of small
portable electronics which Sony began with the Walkman in what I
suspect was a deliberate echo. It was quite a heroic feat at the time,
and I suspect it may have been partially justified as a chest-beating
product by Sony to cow the competition. Since the 7600 was already the
smallest radio with all its features, there was no need to produce the
SW-100, essentially a 7600 at a quarter or less the size, running on
half the batteries.

I suspect that one of the reasons nobody has duplicated it that Sony
make, and have the design rights for, a number of crucial chips needed
for such miniaturisation. Other makers would have to buy the chips or
licences from Sony, which would add extra cost.

Incidentally, a feature of the SW-100 that I have never seen mentioned
is that it has been very carefully designed to be operable in the
dark. For example, the keys have different shapes and feels, and the
earphone socket has a small blip under it so you can feel for it in
the dark and not confuse it with the adjacent line-out socket which
takes the same plug.

I'm sure as soon as other makers catch up with Sony's chip lead in
radio technology we'll see clones. Until then all we'll see is reduced
function inferior copies. An indication of how hard it was, even for
Sony, to get down to that size, is that Sony haven't produced a Mk II
in the same size but improved features, such as more memory and
display options. All their later receivers have been bigger.

I think we're lucky to have it, and won't see a competitor for many
years yet.

--

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