"Shortwave"? Or "Short-Wave"?

"Shortwave"? Or "Short-Wave"?

Post by King Pineappl » Mon, 31 Dec 2001 21:58:55

I just noticed in responding to a post that my MS Office (which spell checks
my Outlook Express) spellchecked the word "shortwave" and suggested
"short-wave" instead. As an old timer I recall that back in the early days
many DID call it "short-wave"; does anyone have some stories on how it may
have evolved into just one word?

--
Craig
Meredith, NH USA

Drake R8B/Alpha Delta DX Sloper
Sony SW-77
Sony ICF-2010
2 x Phillips/Magnavox D2935
Knight Kit Star Roamer

Tuning since 1963

 
 
 

"Shortwave"? Or "Short-Wave"?

Post by tpp » Mon, 31 Dec 2001 22:40:06


Hello Craig,

Often, words are combined with a hyphen to reflect new usage. That is, when
a term that combines two words first appears in our language, common
practice says that the term is hyphenated. Later, when the term is in common
usage, the hyphen is dropped. 'Shortwave' is a good example.

Today, we see the prefix 'e-' to imply electronic commerce, including
'e-mail' and 'e-business', but whether or not it should have a hyphen
depends on how important it is in your message; just communicating your
thought is more important. However, if you worked for a newspaper, or in
some other writing-related industry, you would follow the company style
guide.

This is probably a whole lot more than you wanted to know, but I was
surprised that MS Office suggested 'short-wave' because it's now a common
term; therefore, no hyphen.

Tom
Atlanta


Quote:> I just noticed in responding to a post that my MS Office (which spell
checks
> my Outlook Express) spellchecked the word "shortwave" and suggested
> "short-wave" instead. As an old timer I recall that back in the early days
> many DID call it "short-wave"; does anyone have some stories on how it may
> have evolved into just one word?

> --
> Craig
> Meredith, NH USA

> Drake R8B/Alpha Delta DX Sloper
> Sony SW-77
> Sony ICF-2010
> 2 x Phillips/Magnavox D2935
> Knight Kit Star Roamer

> Tuning since 1963

 
 
 

"Shortwave"? Or "Short-Wave"?

Post by Jdl11 » Tue, 01 Jan 2002 02:32:07

A "compound noun" is created by adding 2 nouns together, and the hyphen is used
to separate them.  Over time though, the hyphen usually gets dropped because it
becomes redundant and unnecessary.
 
 
 

"Shortwave"? Or "Short-Wave"?

Post by Rollo » Tue, 01 Jan 2002 03:56:14


Quote:

>I just noticed in responding to a post that my MS Office (which spell checks
>my Outlook Express) spellchecked the word "shortwave" and suggested
>"short-wave" instead. As an old timer I recall that back in the early days
>many DID call it "short-wave"; does anyone have some stories on how it may
>have evolved into just one word?

Really interesting question.  My gut reaction is that it should be hyphenated
when it's a unit modifier (used to be called a compound adjective) that modifies
a noun, as in short-wave radio.  Except after thinking about it, short is an
adjective and wave is a noun.  Can a noun modify a noun?  How about "doghouse"?
Should that be one word, or two words?

Hmm, I think a unit modifier can have nouns, because my editor always made me
hyphenate "ground water" when I was using it as an adjective.  Except now people
just write "groundwater", kinda like "shortwave".

Sigh.  Jeez, I've gone around in a circle.  So many puzzles to solve.  Maybe
instead I'll obsess over how "dollarization" made it into the Oxford English
Dictionary this year and what the hell it means.

 
 
 

"Shortwave"? Or "Short-Wave"?

Post by Eric Ferguso » Tue, 01 Jan 2002 15:12:19

Of course, now-a-days, it's known as "World Band" (World-Band? Worldband?"
Just thought I'd add to the confusion! "Big Grin"  :^)
 
 
 

"Shortwave"? Or "Short-Wave"?

Post by Remove The NO In The Reply Addres » Tue, 01 Jan 2002 15:40:39


> Of course, now-a-days, it's known as "World Band" (World-Band? Worldband?"
> Just thought I'd add to the confusion! "Big Grin"  :^)

Thats "Big-grin" with a hyphen, no?  You have to add the obligatory no
or yes to be really in style on newsgroups, no?
73, yes?
-Bill
 
 
 

"Shortwave"? Or "Short-Wave"?

Post by Paul Sexto » Tue, 01 Jan 2002 22:38:03



Quote:>I just noticed in responding to a post that my MS Office (which spell checks
>my Outlook Express) spellchecked the word "shortwave" and suggested
>"short-wave" instead. As an old timer I recall that back in the early days
>many DID call it "short-wave"; does anyone have some stories on how it may
>have evolved into just one word?

All the old references I can find call it "Short Wave", 2 separate words
with no hyphen. I have a 1950s radio with the bands on the dial marked
as "Short Wave", "Medium Wave" & "Long Wave".

I've posted a scan of a page from the instruction book of a 1930s radio,
referring to "Short Wave", to: alt.binaries.pictures.radio

--
Paul Sexton                     Paul's Radio Museum
                                http://www.paulplu.demon.co.uk/radio/
Return address anti-spammed
email to Paul at paulplu dot demon dot co dot uk

 
 
 

"Shortwave"? Or "Short-Wave"?

Post by Ron Hardi » Tue, 01 Jan 2002 22:46:06

Short-wave would be an adjective; no hyphen for the noun.

English puts the words together eventually once they lose their
separate significance in the way they're used.
--
Ron Hardin

On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.

 
 
 

"Shortwave"? Or "Short-Wave"?

Post by Leigh Hanlo » Wed, 02 Jan 2002 07:36:35

As others have stated here, the natural progression is from two words to
hyphenation and then solid. I believe that in the Wired Magazine style
guide, they suggest that's OK to move with warp speed these days and give
stylistic evolution a nudge.

Leigh Hanlon
Chicago, USA

 
 
 

"Shortwave"? Or "Short-Wave"?

Post by Clifton T. Sharp Jr » Sun, 06 Jan 2002 16:18:15


> Short-wave would be an adjective; no hyphen for the noun.

I disagree, because, as you said...

Quote:> English puts the words together eventually once they lose their
> separate significance in the way they're used.

For example, "to-day".

--
Remember, "close" counts in horse-shoes, hand-grenades and nuclear warfare,
but in spamming, it's considered unnecessary precision. -- Alun Jones

 
 
 

"Shortwave"? Or "Short-Wave"?

Post by A. Christian Smit » Sat, 19 Jan 2002 07:20:52

On 12/30/2001 4:58 AM, in article


Quote:> I just noticed in responding to a post that my MS Office (which spell checks
> my Outlook Express) spellchecked the word "shortwave" and suggested
> "short-wave" instead. As an old timer I recall that back in the early days
> many DID call it "short-wave"; does anyone have some stories on how it may
> have evolved into just one word?

> --
> Craig
> Meredith, NH USA

> Drake R8B/Alpha Delta DX Sloper
> Sony SW-77
> Sony ICF-2010
> 2 x Phillips/Magnavox D2935
> Knight Kit Star Roamer

> Tuning since 1963

Craig,

I remember a thread in November or December about the "Short-wave" question.
All I know is that Office:Mac X must have the same spell checker as its
counterpart because it wants to correct "shortwave" with "short-wave".

I just added "shortwave" to the dictionary so it doesn't do it anymore.

acs

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